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Previous public defences

2018

David N.E. McCallum, Digital Representation, Valand Academy

Title
Glitching the Fabric: Strategies of New Media Art Applied to the Codes of Knitting and Weaving

Time and Venue
Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 13:00 in Glashuset, Valand Academy
 

Hanna Nordenhök, Literary Composition, Poetry and Prose, Valand Academy

Title
Det svarta blocket i världen. Läsningar, samtal, transkript

Time and Venue
Friday 14th September 2018 at 13:00 in Glashuset, Valand Academy
 

Helena Kraff, Design, HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts

Title
Exploring pitfalls of participation and ways towards just practices through a participatory design process in Kisumu, Kenya

Opponent
Mugendi K. M’Rithaa

Time and Venue
Friday 4 May 2018, 13:00, HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts, Art Library, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8, Gothenburg

 

2017

Ariana Amacker, Design, HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk
 

Title
Embodying Openness: A pragmatist exploration into the aesthetic experience of design form-giving

Opponent
Maria Hellström Reimer, Professor, School of Arts and Communication (K3), Malmö University

Time and venue
Friday, September 1, 2017, 13.00, HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts, Art Library, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8, Gothenburg

Download dissertation HERE

 


Lena O Magnusson
Research on Arts Education, CUL, HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk

Title
Treåringar, kameror och förskola - en serie diffraktiva rörelser

Opponent
Hillevi Lenz Taguchi, Professor and Co-Director of Early Childhood Education Section, Stockholm University

Time and venue
Friday, October 6, 2017, 13.00, HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts, Art Library, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8, Gothenburg

2016

Mårten Medbo, Design

HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts

Title

Lerbaserad erfarenhet och språklighet

Opponent

Jonna Bornemark, docent Södertörns Högskola
 
Examination Board

Ingela Josefson, Professor, Stockholms konstnärliga högskola
Kjell Rylander, Førsteamanuensis, Kunsthøgskolen i Oslo
Gunnar Almevik, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Institutionen för kulturvård, Göteborgs universitet

Time and venue
Wednesday, 14 December, 2016, 13:00, HDK, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8

Keywords
crafts, artistic research, practical knowledge, clay-based, language-ness, concept-crafting, theory-practice, craft, applied arts, beyond-the-conceptual

Abstract
During the course of the twentieth century, a doubt emerged – first within visual arts, and later also within crafts – where the relevance of the traditional way of making art was addressed, as were thoughts on what was termed ‘empty shape’. The notion that shape in itself was no longer artistically valid is closely linked to notions of materiality as hindrance, and immateriality as freedom – all of which have had a major influence on contemporary visual arts and crafts, in general, and, more specifically, on what I term ‘theory-practice’ within the field of crafts. During the past few decades, increasing proof of this influence on the field of crafts as a whole has also been experienced. As a ceramist expressing myself through clay, form has never been empty, and clay never a hindrance, and my dissertation is an attempt to put materiality as hindrance, and immateriality as freedom, in context, as well as to reflect upon questions related to their emergence and what impact they have within the field of crafts. My point of departure here is my own experience as an artist and ceramist, where inquiring and exploring takes places through practical knowledge. I argue that there is no such thing as immateriality in art and that all artistic expression requires bodily-situated craft skill of some kind in order to be materialised and communicated, as well as to take place in the world. I also argue that art should be seen as what I term ‘language-practice’. Through this practice I craft the concept of ‘clay-based language-ness’ and ‘language- like-ness’ in order to come as close as possible to describing, in words, the kind of communication I wish to create as a ceramist, as well as what art-making (‘art-crafting’) constitutes when conceptual artists create their art. Regarding crafts as a language-practice, however, conflicts with the theory that is setting the tone as well as leading the field of crafts today. I therefore wish, and propose, to find a way out of this conflict-ridden situation. As part of this endeavour, I present the text-based part of the dissertation and the clay-based part of the dissertation – side by side.

Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-982423-4-8 (Printed version)
ISBN: 978-91-982423-5-5 (Digital version)

Download dissertation here.



Märtha Pastorek Gripson, Research on Arts Education

Academy of Music and Drama

Title
Positioner i dans - om genus, handlingsutrymme och dansrörelser i grundskolans praktik.

Opponent
Tone Pernille Östern, Professor in Arts Education with Focus on Dance, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Examination Board
Håkan Larsson, Professor, Göteborgs universitet
Elisabet Öhrn, Professor, Göteborgs universitet
Anna Lindqvist, Fil dr, Umeå universistet

Time and venue
Thursday, 27 October, 2016, 13.00, Academy of Music and Drama

Keywords
Genus, fysisk aktivitet, dansundervisning, estetiskt lärande, kroppslig kommunikation, femininiteter och maskuliniteter, grundskola

Abstract
This doctoral thesis examines gender and dance practice in primary school. More precisely it investigates how gender influences the way dance teachers address their pupils, but also the way that pupils organize and understand themselves and carry out tasks and activities in dance education and dance composition. Accordingly, the thesis takes its starting point in the way that participating schools in Sweden introduce ideas on dance, gender and democracy in education. Theoretically a social constructionist framework is used, mainly drawing upon Butler’s concepts of performativity, the heterosexual matrix and the gaze. The study consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the way that dance education is organized and carried out from a gender perspective. The second part deals with the way pupils carry out a composition task that gives them relatively more freedom to make their own choices. Lessons have been video recorded and analyzed with a focus on the interaction between individuals as well as on a more structural level. The results indicate that many boys enact a limited dance repertoire. They tend to avoid investing in “feminine” movements and they are not used to being observed as bodily symbols. Many girls, on the other hand, are informed by extracurricular dance activities, which give them tools to carry out tasks, but they are also limited by the male gaze. Most of them seem to expand their movements in space by using lines through the body and by interacting with “the audience”. Different genres and educational practices contribute in different ways to the possibility of positioning oneself as two-dimensional or three-dimensional. Dance is presented in mainly two ways, as something and about something. In conclusion, gender plays a crucial role and both restricts and opens up for girls´ and boys´ movements in school dance practice.

Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-982422-6-3 (printed version)
ISBN: 978-91-982422-7-0 (PDF/GUPEA)

Download dissertation here.
 


Andrew Whitcomb, Design

HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts

Title
(re)Forming Accounts of Ethics in Design: Anecdote as a Way to Express the Experience of Designing Together.

Opponent
Clive Dilnot, Professor, School of Art and Design History and Theory, Parsons, New York.

Examination Board
Johan Redström, Professor, Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå universitet
Mat Rosengren, Professor, Litteraturvetenskapliga institutionen, Uppsala universitet
Kristina Lindström, PhD och universitetslektor, Institutionen för Konst, Kultur och Kommunikation, Malmö Högskola

Time and venue
Friday, 14 October 2016, 13:00, HDK, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8, Room 350

Abstract
Designers and design researchers routinely engage other people in shaping preferred futures. Despite a growing recognition of designing as a social practice, however, the ethics of engagement often only appear ‘between the lines’ of the accounts design researchers provide about their experiences designing together. In a practice that often dances between exploration and exploitation, design researchers who overlook the ethics permeating their work can easily perpetuate systems that do more harm than good. To tackle perils that often appear subtly and ambiguously in designing together, the design research community needs to enhance ethical learning. On the ground, ethics does not present itself as dilemmas of principle, but as part of experience. Common forms of accounting for experience, however, often leave out the qualities, feelings, and emotions that play an essential role in guiding the conduct of design researchers. Through this research project, I highlight potential for the artistic — as a form communication that brings forward the qualitative dimension of experience through expression — to open up new avenues for reflecting on the ethics of designing together. The investigation addresses the ethics of everyday conduct — ethics in practice — and how to account for experiences of it. Based on three practice-based design research projects, I use creative writing to develop a series of anecdotes that express the interconnections among experience, engagement, and ethics in designing together. Building on the work of pragmatist philosopher John Dewey, I develop an approach to accounting that emphasizes qualitative experience in practice and in communication. The outcomes of the investigation contribute to design research by showing that, if designers want to communicate experience, they need to express it. Three parts of the thesis support this overall contribution. First, I show that the design research community has neglected the expression of experience. Second, I make a pragmatist theoretical framework accessible to design researchers, who can use it as support for maintaining the unity of experience in their own expressive accounts. Third, I make a methodological contribution by providing concrete examples of how to express experience through the development of anecdotes based on particular moments. Ultimately, this research investigation shows that matching the unruly ethics of designing together requires communicating experience through expressive forms that can broaden the ethical sensitivities of design researchers.

Download dissertation here.
 


Cecilia Grönberg, Photography,

Valand Academy

Title
Händelsehorisont || Event horizon. Distribuerad fotografi.

Opponent
Solveig Jülich, Professor, Department of History of Science and Ideas at Uppsala University
Trond Lundemo, Reader, researcher and lecturer, Department of Media Studies at Stockholm University

Examination Board
Anna Dahlgren, Professor, Department of Culture and Aesthitics, Stockholm University
Nils Olsson, PhD in Comparative literature, Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, University of Gothenburg
Emma Kihl, artist and researcher

Time and venue
Friday, 7 October, 13:00, Glashuset, Chalmersgatan 4

Abstract
In recent decades, photography as a technology has undergone a series of transformative changes, which have, in turn, entailed different renegotiations of the functions of photography – as image or information, as inscription or transmission. Within the framework of such a radical shift, this dissertation in photography insists on probing into and exploring the persisting effects of analogue photographs within digital ecologies. Händelse­ horisont || Event Horizon employs the “event horizon” as an image and a concept, as a space for projection, and as an interface through which reflections on the different ways in which we meet and associate with photographic images in a context of digital production, publishing and circulation are enabled.

Digital photography is a distributed form. This study, with its subtitle Distributed photo­graphy, explores the different visual and artistic implications of a disseminated position, proceeding by taking assistance from the octopus, a “soft intelligence” – which then, in turn, is the starting point for an eight-armed image- and text-based essay. This essay then tentatively follows the tentacular forms of manifestation that octopuses, these very complex molluscs, take on through history and literature – as life-forms and media systems.

Händelsehorisont is primarily a photographed book, with photographic practice not coming to a halt with the individual image that is produced, but where practice also takes place in the montage between texts, documents and contexts. In that regard the dissertation is also a book that generates a number of different constellations for reading, at the same time as it gives rise to specific fields of gravity where circulating or floating images can be captured through other images, thereby creating new densities and fields of energy. One of these gravitational fields is an essay that studies forms for what comes to be called montage-based visual historiography.

The dissertation is situated in a movement between different images and systems, between different technologies and ways of reading, and between different humans, animals, and software. It dwells at surfaces and spaces that can offer openings for future, not yet defined, photographic shapes and forms of life.

OEI editör
ISBN: 978-91-85905-85-0

Händelsehorisont || Event Horizon. Distribuerad fotografi is a 1012-page printed book. A central aspect of the dissertation is publishing as an artistic practice and the book as medium. The 73-page introduction to the book is available in digital form.

Read introduction here.
 


Johan Petri, Performance in Theatre and Music Drama

HSM - Academy of Music and Drama

Title
The Rhythm of Thinking. Immanence and Ethics in Theater Performance

Opponent
Maaike Bleeker, professor and head of Theatre Studies, University of Utrecht

Examination Board
Karmenlara Ely, Associate Professor and Artistic Director Acting, Akademi for Scenekunst (Høgskolen i Østfold)
Knut Ove Arntzen, Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Utrecht
Anders Hultqvist, Professor of Composition, HSM - Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg

Time and venue
Film screenings of three documented performances: Friday 16 September, 9.30, Bio Valand, Chalmersgatan 4
Public Defence: Friday, 16 September, 14:00, Glashuset, Chalmersgatan 4

Short description
The dissertation The Rhythm of Thinking: Immanence and Ethics in Theater Performance is an artistic research project in the field of theater, with directing and theatrical composition and dramaturgy as its main points of focus. The critical exploration is based on the experience of conceptualizing and directing three different theater performances, all built around material that in one way or another originated from the American composer and artist John Cage (1912–1992). These performances function as the main references throughout the investigation.

The project is an attempt to explore the implications of the concept of immanence in the collective creative process of theater making. In particular, it is an effort to illuminate what might be called “processes of immanence” or “theater of immanence”. The research presents a net of questions, observations and thoughts ranging from the experiences of collective creative processes and collaborative work with the performers, to academic criticism on discourses related to the fields of performance studies, philosophy and performance philosophy, perception theory, and musicology. The unfurling of this net is intended to contribute to the ideas and theories surrounding the relationship between the structural specifics of theater – dramaturgically and compositionally – and the aspects of meaning and affect. Though, that formulation also encapsulates a number of sub-areas to which the investigation aims to contribute with problematizing insertions, areas that can be broadly defined as: transforming theories into concrete compositional and processual measures; developing dramaturgical discourses beyond semantic language; problematizing a binary relation between composition/ conceptualization and an intuitive, emotional creative force; discussing how to enhance a readiness for variation in the performers; problematizing hierarchical structures, both in regards to the hierarchy of expressions, as well as creative influence; mapping out a thought process for a directorial practice; and finally, searching for a possible reciprocity between compositional structures and ethics.

There are three important aspects that the three performances share, and that illuminate the questions that are being problematized. The first and most crucial aspect is what alternately are labeled multiplicities, individual expressive trajectories, superimpositions, expressive polyphony, and an overload. These are terms and phenomena descriptive of an expressive instability and convergent with the idea that the expression consolidates through the indeterminate unfolding of multiple expressive relations and not through thorough composition. The second aspect is that they are dependent on a strong creative investment by the performers – on their capacity to improvise and invent – since the conceptual setups place, at the center, the creative responsibility of the individual performer. This circumstance, which is thoroughly explicated in the reasoning, is formulated in order to set an immanent creative movement in motion. The third aspect shared by the performances, in different ways, is that they are all formed around musical compositions, and embedded in musical movements. This is not only crucial to the structure and intensity of the performances, but it also influences the critical gaze and the concepts and terms that are used in the investigation. The titles of the performances are John and the Mushrooms, vorschläge and Ryaonji – A Meeting.

Three different types of texts are presented in the project: descriptive texts, essays, and interviews. They intentionally unfold in somewhat different modes, and, therefore, meant to create a juxtapositional dynamic. The descriptive texts document the making of the three theater performances, going into detail, regarding material, dramaturgical organization and conceptualization, rehearsal processes, and the performance situations. These texts are linked to filmed documentations, still pictures, side texts of an explanatory quality, sound/music recordings/documentations, to interviews with the performers, and to musical scores and manuscripts. The essays pull the work with the performances into a more taut reflective apparatus. They are developed to elevate the tactile experiences and the structural observations into an esthetic-philosophical reasoning, by investigating the connections between the performances and a broader existential/philosophical outlook on life. As such they enclose the practice, by revealing what reverberates underneath the esthetics of the performances, as well as indicating what hovers above them, as possible prolongations.

The interviews that are included in the project are conducted by the Institute for Unpredictable Processes. They are placed in conjunction with the themes reflected on in the texts surrounding them and should be seen as critical expansions, but in a different mode.

The investigated materials are theater performances and the questions stem from situations when making and perceiving theater. Though, in the critical treatment the research activates philosophical discourses rather than performance studies perspectives. This philosophical approach is mainly represented by the French philosopher Gillez Deleuze (1925–1995), but also by the Canadian philosopher Brian Massumi (1956–), and the Italian/Australian philosopher Rosi Braidotti (1954–). A number of secondary sources and critical extensions that utilize Deleuze’s theories in discussions on art and theater are used, as well as some within the field of performance studies. Among these are the philosopher and performance studies scholar Laura Cull, the philosopher and Deleuze-scholar Claire Colebrook, the art theoretician and Deleuze-scholar Simon O’Sullivan, the performance studies scholar Erika Fischer-Lichte, and the philosopher and Deleuze-scholar Manuel Delanda.

The dissertation The Rhythm of Thinking; Immanence and Ethics in Theater Performance is published as a book but also as a multimedia platform that can be reached at www.gupea.ub.gu.se. This complete format will give the reader access to filmed documentations and audio examples of the different performances that are being discussed and critically treated in the text, as well as additional material like images, scripts and music scores.
 


Annica Karlsson Rixon, Photography

Valand Academy

Title
Queer Community through Photographic Acts. Three Entrances to an Artistic Research Project Approaching LGBTQIA Russia.

Opponent
Nina Wakeford, Reader, Goldsmiths University of London

Examination Board
Alyssa Grossman, PhD, Researcher, Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg
Jan Kaila, photographer, Scientific advisor in Artistic Research, Swedish Research Council, Researcher at the University of the Arts Helsinki
Marianne Liljeström, Professor in Gender Studies, University of Turku (Åbo), Finland

Time and venue
Friday, 26 August, 2016, 14:00, World Culture Museum, Södra vägen 54, Gothenburg

Nyckelord
queer community, photographic acts, fotografisk gestaltning, photography, feminist theory, queer theory, community, embodied position, movement, performativity, intersectionality, situated knowledge, in-between, insider, outsider, Russian LGBTQIA, artistic research, Trinh T. Minh-ha.

Abstract
The compilation thesis is made within the field of fotografisk gestaltning (photography) and is a study of the potential for queer community to emerge through photographic acts. It consists of two artworks that have been presented in a series of exhibitions, published texts, workshops, and lectures. The artworks are the photography-, video-, and sound-based installation State of Mind, and the photographic series At the Time of the Third Reading/Vid tiden för den tredje läsningen/Во время третьего чтения, which is presented as framed images as well as in book form.

The publication Queer Community through Photographic Acts introduces the research through three entry points: photography, queer, and artworks. The first two entries highlight how these concepts are used in the research as practices and theories. The latter is a written visit to the artworks that takes place from different temporal and situational positions, and reflects on the work with LGBTQIA issues and community over borders.

The focus is on the emergence of community within, and through, the artworks, and how this may produce recognition of certain identities. At the same time, the artworks may destabilize what is taken for norms. How community emerges in the process of making art, as well as when activating the finalized works through exhibitions, workshops, and other presentations, is also explored.

The subject of the artworks is lesbian living in St. Petersburg, a Russian women’s camp, and how one may navigate through society as queer identities. Group portraits and community form the overall foundation for the gestaltning of the artworks. The conditions for making art with the Russian LGBTQIA community as an artist from abroad are taken into consideration, as well as other shared embodied positions such as queerness and whiteness. This is performed through notions of positions and movement, as well as paying attention to an in-between – Trinh T. Minh-ha’s concept which opens for a space of change and resistance to fixed positioning.

ISBN: 978-91-88031-03-7 (printed version)
ISBN: 978-91-88031-30-3 (digital version)

Download dissertation here.

The dissertation exhibition State of Mind - Queer lives in Russia is ongoing at the Museum of World Culture, Gothenburg from June 8 to September 4, 2016.
 


Thomas Laurien, Design

HDK - Academy of Design and Crafts

Title
Händelser på ytan - shibori som kunskapande rörelse
English title: Events on the Surface – Shibori as Knowledge-Forming Motion

Time and venue
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 13:00, HDK, Room 350

Opponent
Cilla Robach, Vice-chancellor, Beckmans Designhögskola

Examination Board

  • Cheryl Akner Koler, Fil dr, professor Konstfack
  • Staffan Appelgren, Fil dr, universitetslektor, Institution för globala studier, Göteborgs universitet
  • Åsa Stahl, Fil dr, postdoc Designhögskolan, Umeå universitet

Keywords
shibori, surface, form event, knowledge-forming motion, artistic research, artistic practice, art-making, textile craftscape, curating, cultural heritage, performativity, cabinet of curiosity, wonder, affect, sensation

Abstract
In present times, shibori, though originally a Japanese word, is an international umbrella term for craft techniques related to the dyeing of textiles. In an artistic context, shibori signifes the act of (e)laborating by way of compressions – in order to create patterning and/or three dimensionality.

In and through a practice-based artistic research project, the question: What is shibori, and what does shibori do? acts as my guide, where the initial focus is on the introduction and development of shibori as an artistic practice in a Swedish context. Here, Japan takes on a main role, albeit in the form of a backdrop – subtly but noticeably in uencing the events being staged.

Shibori comes to take the shape of a vehicle, and I, the researcher, have set the vehicle and myself in a knowledge-forming motion, where interviews are conducted with artists in Sweden, courses in shibori are observed and taken part in, group shows are performed in Japan and Sweden, as well as addressed through the written work that comes into being. Curatorial experiences are also re ected upon in a number of closely-connected essays. A space, in the format of an essay, is created as part of the nal stage – where shibori meets concepts such as wonder, affect and sensation, and where questions on the role and impact of discursive language in art-making and art experience are raised.

Answers to the research question “What is shibori, and what does shibori do?” gradually surface and highlight an abundance of aspects and insights. These include: discovering that artists approach shibori in independent ways, whilst still safeguarding Japanese material and immaterial cultural heritage; shibori becoming a space of possibles, characterised by the presence of strong intention and the appreciation of chance, side-by-side, in mutual interaction; and curatorial experience acting to highlight shibori in its role to enhance the experience of plenitude. Shibori thus comes to signify the forming, as well as the experiencing, of knowledge – in motion between theory and practice – where broader issues, such as the construction of identity, the creation of acting spaces through performative negotiations, as well as curating as both an artistic research method and an artistic act of making, are also revealed.

Beholding and re ecting, I perceive that the envisioning and staging of Events on the Surface have enabled, and continue to enable me, in my quest to find a way into the conceptual, bodily and material constituents of shibori-making, in particular, and artistic practice, in general.

Download dissertation here.


2015

Elke Marhöfer, Fine Arts

Valand Academy

Title
Ecologies of Practices and Thinking

Time and Place
Wednesday, 16th December - Thursday, 17th December, 2015

Wednesday, December 16, 18:00, film screening
No, I am not a Toad, I am a Turtle! (44 minutes, South Korea and China, 2012)
Venue: Bio Valand, Akademin Valand

Thursday, December 17, 10:00, film screening
The films prendas — ngangas — enquisos — machines {each part welcomes the other without saying} (25 minutes, Cuba, 2014), Nobody knows, when it was made and why (10 minutes, England, 2012-15), and Shape Shifting (18 minutes, Japan, 2015, in collaboration with Mikhail Lylov)
Venue: Bio Göta 3, Götaplatsen

Public Defence from 13:30
Venue: Glashuset, Valand Academy.

Opponent
Dr Silke Panse, Reader in Film, Art and Philosophy, Fine Art, School of Fine Art, University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury

Examination Board

  • Dr Erling Björgvinsson, professor vid HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Göteborgs universitet
  • Dr Felicity Colman, professor of film and media art, Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Dr Matts Leiderstam, professor vid Konsthögskolan i Malmö, Lunds universitet

Keywords
new materialism, film, image, matter, nonhuman, more-than-human, other-than-human, not-so-human, ecology, agriculture, otherness, storytelling, enunciation, post-context, post-history, animism, colonialism, becoming with, seeing together, lines of flight, modes, animals, plants, things, territories, multiplicities, chaos, expressive continuum, rerational aesthetics, radical empiricism, Baruch Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, Isabelle Stengers, Donna Haraway, Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Brian Massumi, Danièle Huillet, Jean Marie Straub

Abstract
How does a new materialist film practice look? To approach this question the practice-led material driven research explores dynamic ecological relations and processes of thinking and practicing. It employs an animist methodology which allows it to relate to the nonhuman as an active participant, rather than a passive object of inquiry. By this it activates a path into materiality and knowledge production different from conventional human-focused epistemologies and intensifies affinities and bonds with the other-than-human. Forming particular connections with matter and situating oneself within specific and relations, the project mobilizes and is mobilized by the affects, percepts and sensations of the more-than-humans. The first chapter inquires into inherited scientific, technological, social-political and philosophical epistemologies often based on colonial and anthropocentric presumptions and mappings of the world.

However, the research does not strive to rewrite or reclaim for example, a certain history or a place, it instead outlines concepts like becoming or lines of flight that pass through these legacies, building more complex and fruitful interrelations and geographies. The writing often collaborates with Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, as their philosophy explicitly acknowledges inhuman forces and ambiguous ontologies. In the second chapter the focus moves towards processes, when individuals become multiplicities, when animals, plants and things are endowed with inhuman force or personhood, when matter is enthusiastic and territories are not just static backgrounds. From here the research literally travels. It travels with specific singularities and their material based practices — an entire ecology of practice often building innumerable interconnections and even landscapes. Situating itself within the ecological relational field, the research project explores methodologies of collaboration and becoming with the more-than-human practiced by sorcerers and fabulists from Cuba and South Korea, and by farmers from China, Burkina Faso and Japan.

Download dissertation here.


Lisa Tan, Fine Arts

Valand Academy

Title:
For every word has its own shadow: Sunsets, Notes From Underground, Waves

Time and place
Tuesday, 15th December - Wednesday, 16th December, 2015

Tuesday, 15th December
Film screening time: 18:00 - 19:15
Venue: Bio Valand, Valand Academy, Storgatan 43

Wednesday, 16th December
Film screening times: 9:30-10:45 and 10:45-12:00
Venue: Bio Valand, Valand Academy

Public defence 13:00
Venue: Glashuset, Valand Academy, entrance via Chalmersgatan 4

Opponent
Gertrund Sandqvist, professor, Malmö Academy of Arts, and Annika Wik, Researcher

Examination Board

  • Eva Zetterman, Senior lecturer, Department of Cultural Sciences, Humanities Faculty, University of Gothenburg
  • Nils Olsson, Senior lecturer, Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, Humanities Faculty, University of Gothenburg
  • Simon O'Sullivan, Reader in Art Theory and Practice, Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths University of London

Keywords
affect, becoming, Maurice Blanchot, displacement, dispossession, essay film, experimental video, geological time, liminal, Clarice Lispector, materialism, primordial obscurity, provisional, solitude, Susan Sontag, threshold, transformation, translation, video, video installation, Virginia Woolf

Abstract
Liminality permeates this doctoral project's questions: how can an expe- rience of the liminal exist as an artwork? What things and experiences can orient us towards affectivity and states of becoming? Lisa Tan relates such concerns to Clarice Lispector whose writing renders becoming(s) visible. Coupled with Maurice Blanchot and his literary discourse on dispossession and the outside (analogous to becoming), Tan's inquiry is critically engaged inside a moving image practice. A suite of videos: Sunsets, 2012; Notes From Underground 2013; and Waves 2014-15, stand as the primary output of this dissertation. Drifting between day and night, above and below ground, land and sea, they exist as movements towards the fulfillment of the promise of the liminal: transformation.

In Sunsets, the sun converses with the force that is Clarice Lispector. The video documents the audio of a casual translation of an interview with Lispector from 1977. This recording forms the video's soundtrack. The visual footage is comprised of scenes that were filmed at 3 o’clock
in the morning during the summer or 3 o’clock in the afternoon during the winter in Sweden. Notes from Underground connects the Stockholm metro and Susan Sontag’s sojourn in Sweden with a cavern system 5,000 miles away in New Mexico. The video suggestively links this journey to experiences of liminality, narrating varied intensities of geological time and strata of personal and cultural history. Departing from Virginia Woolf’s novel The Waves, Tan’s video Waves imagines how conscious- ness forms in relation to society and its technologies, but also to expres- sions of geological and hydrological processes. Filmed at the threshold of land and sea, a conversation forms between disparate hydro-relations, such as Woolf’s prose, Courbet’s paintings of waves, Google’s data cen- ters cooled by the Baltic Sea, invisible jellyfish, and transoceanic cables.

The dissertation includes the videos, a doctoral thesis, and an artist's book, containing: illustrated transcriptions of each video; a documented solo exhibition; texts by Mara Lee, Lauren O’Neill-Butler, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, and Lisa Tan. The artist's book both documents and reflects on the research performed and involves the voices of others, providing a critical, intersubjective understanding of liminality.

Download dissertation here.
 


Helga Krook, Literary Composition, Poetry and Prose

Valand Academy

Title
Minnesrörelser

Time and Place
Friday, 24 April, 2015, 13.00 in Glashuset, Akademin Valand

Opponent
Professor emeritus Arne Melberg

Examination Board

  • Alexander Bareis, docent, institutionen för tyska, Lunds universitet
  • Sigrid Combüchen, författare, kritiker, Författarskolan, Lunds universitet
  • Åsa Arping, lektor, institutionen för litteratur, idéhistoria och religion, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
The starting point of the doctoral project Minnesrörelser (Movements of Memory) is a documentary material, based on interviews, archival documents, letters, diaries and more, from Germany and Sweden from the 1930’s to present time focusing on childhood, upbringing, eugenics, bilingualism. The family as a place for historical writing, family stories inevitably connected with political history, and how they can be passed on or kept secret makes up the main subject matter, where questions of memory and postmemory, heritage and transgenerational consequences of oppression and guilt, as well as the role of silence, speaking and translation, are investigated.

The project is considered a very practice-based one but also a historical one, as a link in the life of stories in the material interwoven with the history of Germany in the 1930’s and 40’s and of Sweden in the period of Folkhemmet. The way the project has developed and come to a preliminary end, that is, this dissertation, is in itself a story, an open end narrative, where the roles of the author and the reader are focused on. The famous statement by Roland Barthes that the birth of the reader must be at the cost of the death of the author is used as an impulse, along with Novalis’ view on reading and writing as an ever continuing literary dissemination process.

Different perspectives and opposites like family album/reference book, memory/history, ruin/reconstruction, daughter/daughter are reflected upon through the reasonings of, among others, Aleida Assmann, Harald Welzer, Marianne Hirsch and Pierre Nora as well as through different works of art, literature and historical documentation, for example by Victor Klemperer, Irina Liebmann, Susan Hiller, David Chipperfield. The dissertation is an artistic way of focusing a complex of problems of narration, which remain, naturally, unsolved.

Download dissertation here.
 


João Segurado, Musical Performance and Interpretation

Academy of Music and Drama, in collaboration with Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Luleå University of Technology

Title
Never heard before: a musical exploration of organ voicing

Time and Place
Saturday, 28 February, 2015, in konsertsalen, Studio Acusticum, Piteå

Program:
11.00 Disputationskonsert. João Segurado, orgel
13.00 Framförande av João Segurados ljudkomposition
”The wind in the word”
14.00 Disputation

Opponent
Professor Hans Hellsten, Musikhögskolan i Malmö, Lunds universitet

Examination Board

  • Førsteamanuensis Catharina Christophersen, Universitetet i Bergen, Norge
  • Professor Peter Peitsalo, Sibelius-Akademin, Helsingfors
  • Universitetslektor Joel Speerstra, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
This dissertation examines the practice of voicing and its implications for musical performance. Organ sounds are shaped to suit the practice of musical performance, and they influence that practice in significant ways. This study seeks to describe precisely the role those sounds play in the context of musical performance and interpretation. More broadly, it examines the visions and artistic perspectives of those who create the sounds and those who use them in performance— voicers and musicians.

Pipe sounds are shaped by a practitioner called a voicer, in a process that is essentially one of gradual transformation of sound; that process is called voicing. The task of voicing demands excellent manual dexterity, solid theoretical knowledge, and a keen sense of hearing.

The name voicing also suggests an approach to sounds that seems to transcend those aspects of the craft. Voicing means to give voice, and to give voice means to give life. The sounds of the organ are thus shaped with the intent to epitomize forms of human expression, and those forms of expression will be heard in the context of a musical practice. Thus: what exactly constitutes an organ voice? What type of concerns emerge during this process of voicing? In which ways do the voices that are created influence the music performed on the organ?

The answers to those questions were investigated in the context of a collaboration between a voicer and an organist (the author), over a period of roughly two years, while an organ was being built for the concert hall Studio Acusticum at Piteå, in northern Sweden. Since the researcher was a musician, the research questions are naturally approached from a musical stance.

This study comes under the umbrella of artistic research, and its results are not only articulated verbally, but also, and just as importantly, enacted through artistic content. The dissertation includes the creation of new artworks, and the exploration of artistic media. The ethnographic model is clearly felt within the text as well, as it deals mostly with examination of documents, dialogues, sounds, events, and the perspectives of different people.

The title of the dissertation—Never Heard Before—was originally the motto for the new Studio Acusticum organ, that served as a platform for the study. Here it serves to express the idea that the voicer-musician encounter has not previously been the subject of research, and that the
materials presented in the text—both the dialogues and the sounds collected during the process of voicing—were things never heard before.

Download dissertation here.
 


2014

Marie-Louise Hansson Stenhammar, Research on Arts Education

Academy of Music and Drama

Title
En avestetiserad skol- och lärandekultur – en studie om lärprocessers estetiska dimension

Time and place
Friday, 27 March, 2014, 10.00 in Lingsalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Professor Geir Johansen, Norges Musikkhøgskole

Examination Board

  • Professor Anders Marner Umeå universitet
  • Professor Gunnar Åsén Stockholms universitet
  • FD Tarja Häikiö, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
In this dissertation teaching and learning is studied based on the concepts of arts-based learning processes and the methods of art. I discuss the ontology of arts-based learning processes in relation to arts methods and how that relationship can be related to the learning processes that are made visible in the classroom work of a 5th grade class in a Swedish Primary school.Learning and knowledge are also addressed from a sociocultural perspective and within a social constructionist theoretical framework, based on Lev Vygotskij’s theories on the interplay between thinking and language, and the relationship between reproduction and creativity as a prerequisite for development and learning.The main study was preceded by a pilot study in which a portfolio method was tested in three classes in Primary school, grades 2-6. The experience gained from the pilot study led to an ethnographically influenced methodology and method in the main study. The main study is a case study where data from 33 participants were produced over a period of 4 weeks through daily field studies in all subjects on the schedule (with the exception of physical education and health), observations and teacher and student interviews. In order to deepen and gain a perspective on the analysis of the field notes and interviews, they are discussed in relation to artistic, psychological and teaching and learning perspectives, as well as in relation to a poststructuralist view of language.The results show evidence of a de-aestheticised school and learning culture in the sense that the teaching, regardless of the subject, primarily focuses and produces a way of thinking on learning and knowledge formation which is based on a reproducing process of quantitative character. The results also indicate that there are meaning-making actions where pupils describe learning that requires ingenuity, ability to illustrate and imagine, as well as to combine past experiences with new impressions through reflection. These descriptions are identified as innovative, configurative and reflective actions.

Download disseration here.


Mara Lee Gerdén, Literary Composition, Poetry and Prose

Valand Academy

Title
När andra skriver: skrivande som motstånd, ansvar och tid

Time and Place
Friday, 28 November, 2014, 13.00 in Lingsalen, Studenternas Hus, Götabergsgatan 17, Göteborg

Opponent
Lektor Lilian Munk Rösing, Institut for Kunst- og Kulturvidenskab, Københavns Universitet

Examination Board

  • Ulrika Dahl, docent, Södertörns högskola
  • Annelie Bränström Öhman, professor, Umeå universitet
  • Andrej Slavik, fil dr, Humanistiska fakulteten, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
How would a writer describe responsibility in writing, and in what ways could writing be conceived as resistance? One of the fundamental convictions in The writing of Others: writing conceived as resistance, responsibility and time, is that words do things, and that the definition of the performative qualities of literary and poetic language can not be confined to the mere act, but to an act that is also an event with the force to transform our relation the other. This dissertation is committed to doing theory, poetically, by engaging in the empirical experience of writing, and emphasizing the significance of bodily and sensory knowledge. The French literary tradition of écriture féminine with precursors Hélène Cixous and Julia Kristeva constitutes a crucial reference as this tradition stresses the importance of poetic language in knowledge production. But writing écriture féminine for the third millenium entails further thinking within this very tradition, as Other times are now prevailing. Others and times are precisely the keys to this elaboration of the tradition of écriture féminine, inscribing postcolonial thinking into the writing experience and focusing on the question of temporality. The writers Trinh T Minh-ha and Gloria Anzaldúa are both of vital importance for the articulation of a feminist point of view combined with postcolonial criticism that is steadily anchored in literary and linguistic grounds. Regarding the focus on temporality this study aims at two things: on the one hand displacing and analyzing “old” theoretical concepts as for instance das Unheimliche and mimicry, and on the other hand creating and coining new temporal figurations. These new figurations – the last hour, the tearing moment, the shared Schmertzpunkt and the arrested time – provide embodied theoretical concepts and point towards the intersection of resistance, responsibility and time. The question of responsibility is explored throughout this study – the question if and how the writing of Others might be a specific way of being responsible in writing.

Avhandlingen är utgiven på Glänta produktion.

Download dissertation here.
 


Tina Kullenberg, Research on Arts Education

Academy of Music and Drama

Title
Signing and Singing - Children in Teaching Dialogues

Time and Place
Friday, 26 September, 2014, 10:00, Lingsalen (A505), Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Professor Monika Nerland, Universitetet i Oslo

Examination Board

  • Professor Marléne Johansson, HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Göteborgs universitet
  • Docent Oskar Lindwall, Institutionen för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande, IPKL, Göteborgs universitet
  • Biträdande professor Bo Nilsson, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Högskolan Kristianstad

Abstract
The dissertation examines children’s dialogical sense-making in task-oriented teaching activities, the aim of which is to explore children’s values and ideas in musical learning, in order to investigate how musical knowledge is constructed collaboratively through different levels of dialogicality. Hence, the study addresses the organizational resources and values at stake when children take part in pedagogical dialogues. The four children studied are allocated the pre-given task of instructing each other, without the presence of adults, to sing songs in dyads (two and two). Five singing activities are video-documented, transcribed and analysed in depth through dialogical activity analysis, and group interviews with the children in pairs are also conducted, transcribed and analysed. A sociocultural perspective on learning and communication with an approach based on dialogue theory forms the analytical point of departure for the study, where constitutive relations between the mediating acts of the participants and the resources in use – in the shape of discourses, cultural tools, representations, interaction orders, activity frames and values – are focused upon, and where teaching and learning are viewed as primarily communicative activities, and where learning as a purely individual process is dismissed. The practice of musical teaching is seen to be an embodied and materialized practice, even though the young practitioners taking part in the study displayed different knowledge ideals, as well as different educational strategies, throughout the instructional phases of activity. In other words, they emphasized that there was a distinction between learning the songs and knowing the songs. The participants also used signing and singing with the help of artefacts, words and their bodies in a number of multi-functional, multi-semiotic and subtle ways. Moreover, the children organized their activities as traditional classroom teaching in several ways, and displayed skills in schooling as practitioners of a social practice. Accordingly, they established a school-specific task culture that took the form of a communicative activity type, where their orientation to double dialogicality, that is, the dialogue of the culturally established dimension on the one hand, and the interpersonal, local context on the other, is of significance.

Download dissertation here.


Carina Borgström-Källén, Research on Arts Education

Academy of Music and Drama

Title
När musik gör skillnad - genus och genrepraktiker i samspel
English title: When Music Makes a Difference – Gender and Genre Practice in Interplay

Time and Place
Friday, 23 May, 2014, 10.00, Lingsalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Petter Dyndahl, professor, Högskolen Hedmark, Norge

Examination Board

  • Karin Johansson, docent, musikhögskolan i malmö, Lunds universitet
  • Johan Söderman, docent, institutionen för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande, Göteborgs universitet
  • Hillevi Ganetz, professor institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Stockholms universitet

Abstract
The specific aim of the thesis is to highlight and problematise how gender in interplay with practice of genre is expressed and constructed in musical action. I discuss the interplay between gender and genre practice in conjunction with music education based on the empirical findings from eight ensemble groups in Swedish upper secondary arts programmes.

The study has a gender theoretical framework based on social constructionist and poststructuralist perspectives. The thesis deploys an ethnographic methodology and approach, and data from 71 participants, aged 16 to 19, was produced within a period of one year through participant observations and interviews. Deconstruction is used in parts of the field notes and interviews, the intention of which is to offer a second opinion and deepen the analysis.

The results show that construction of gender in musical actions is salient in almost every situation where the participants make music together, but that it is performed in different ways depending on genre practice. The results also indicate that the informants, who all had music as their main subject, put gender at stake when it comes to relations of production, power and symbols. Furthermore, the choices the pupils were enabled to make in terms of educational content in their musical learning appear to contribute to a restricted acting space, since their choices are strictly gendered. The results also imply that norms of quality in genre discourses are closely tied to positions of gender, and that knowledge and cultural capital reduce the restricting effects of the heterosexual matrix. Findings suggest that teachers’ intentions towards informal learning settings seem to gender the conditions for musical learning, especially in popular music practice. Finally, the results show that genre practice that includes music unfamiliar to the pupils is least restricted by gender.

Download dissertation here.
 


Niclas Östlind, Photography

Valand Academy
Title

Performing History. Fotografi i Sverige 1970-2014

Time and Place
Tuesday, 3rd June, 13.00, Hörsalen, Göteborgs konstmuseum, Götaplatsen, Göteborg

Opponent
Christine Hansen, docent, fil.dr i konsthistoria, konstnär (fotografi)

Examination Board

  • Patrick Amsellem, fil dr, curator, chef för Skissernas museum, Lund
  • Milou Allerholm, konstkritiker, lektor i konsthistoria, Kungl. Konsthögskolan, Stockholm
  • Karin Wagner, docent i konst- och bildvetenskap, IT-universitetet (GU/Chalmers)

Keywords
Photography, curatorial practice, history, narrative, cultural sociology, field and narrative interviews

Abstract
Title: Performing History: Fotografi i Sverige 1970–2014
English title: Performing History: Photography in Sweden 1970–2014
Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-981712-0-4 (Dissertation edition/Disputationsupplaga)

Using curatorial practice as a method, this thesis maps and investigates photography in Sweden 1970–2014. The study deepens the knowledge of photography mainly exhibited in institutions and/or having been organised by actors that define themselves as photographic. It also contributes to producing new knowledge of the relationship between photography and art, and of the ways in which various social, economic and political spaces (in a broad sense), where the audience has encountered photography, have affected the production, display
and reception of photography.

It is an investigation of photography, with photography and through photography, where the exhibition practice functions as an optics that defines and sharpens the perspective, and partly as a method with which the results are tested and visualized. The exhibitions contain an active display of the material. They form spatial and temporal narratives, which show a distinctly self-reflective perspective explicitly stating that the history put forward is one of several possible
narratives.

The thesis gives answers to questions regarding the type of photography that has been exhibited, where and how it has been shown, who have been the driving forces behind photography exhibitions and how these aspects have changed or remained the same over time. It also examines and answers questions about the institutional and sociological conditions for photographic exhibition practices, and thereby also about a central aspect of the photographic field.

The structure of the study is made up of different coordinated parts, which are devoted to different perspectives. The theoretical narration as a point of departure and the narrative interviews – that constitute an important part of the study – give space to include and to accentuate, the different actors and their historical stories. It also points to the various ways in which history, seen through the categories of history theory, has been used and what kind of historical narrative the thesis itself is an example of.

Download dissertation here.
 


Ulf Friberg, Performance in Theatre and Music Drama

Title
Den kapitalistiska skådespelaren - aktör eller leverantör?

Time and Place
Monday, 7th April, 2014
11.00 framförs akten ”Tystnad” i Studion, Stadsteatern, Göteborg
13.00 hålls disputationsakten i Jacobsonteatern, Högskolan för scen och musik vid Göteborgs universitet, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Sven-Eric Liedman, professor emeritus i idé och lärdomshistoria, Göteborgs universitet

Examination Board

  • Carolina Frände, teaterchef och regissör, Stockholms Stadsteater, Skärholmen
  • Jens Stilhoff Sörensen, lektor i Freds-och Utvecklingsforskning, Globala Studier, Göteborgs universitet
  • Anders Hultqvist, kompositör och lektor i komposition, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
The dissertation revolves around an actor’s craft as a changing craft. Theatre workers – like many other professions in sweden – have experienced major changes in the Labour market during a relatively short period of time. In what way has capitalistic ideology changed society over the last 25 years, and in what way has this affected the actor’s craft, and what impact has been experienced? What strategies can the field of the theatre, in general, and the actors, in particular, use to create space for the development of the craft of acting in a new era?

The different parts of the dissertation attack the questions mentioned above from a number of different angles. References from other disciplines such as philosophy, the History of Ideas and Sociology, which are placed in dialogue with the theatre in this dissertation project, are all-important. In the first part of the dissertation, the author positions the research and himself and also presents the methods used and the theories from other disciplines through which he discusses the issues to be addressed.

The next section discusses leadership and organisation through the 1990’s until today. The economic crises that affected sweden during this time not only produced fairly extensive changes for publicly funded theatres but also brought about a changing balance of power in theatres.

Theatrical craft is discussed in the next section, where the main questions addressed are: in what way do changes in power relations affect the actor’s craft? What is the actor’s craft and who is really portraying the role? Actors in fact need what the author would like to call “informal power” in relation to their craft; however, this informal space, the author argues, has been cut back.

The fourth act in this dissertation consists of the text of a play, which adopts a freer and more associative approach to the issues discussed, and, as part of the discussion, is staged in a publicly funded theatre in connection with the actual public defence of the dissertation. The epilogue carries and drives issues towards a changing future – if this future exists.

Download dissertation here.
 


Katarina Wetter Edman, Design - Business & Design

Title
Design for Service: A framework for exploring designers¹ contribution as interpreter of users¹ experience

Time and Place
Fredagen den 4 APRIL 2014 kl 13.00, Aulan, HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk

Opponent
Professor Anna Meroni, Politecnico Milano

Examination Board

  • Professor Mike Press, University of Dundee
  • Professor Steve Vargo, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Dr Lena Hansson, Göteborgs universitet

Abstract
During the past approximately 15 years designers have paid increasing attention to service and changes in our society, resulting in a new design discipline – service design. In parallel, designers’ contributions to service development and innovation have been brought forward, often emphasizing designers’ capability of involving users, acting in and through multidisciplinary teams and using visualization skills in these situations. Previously, most knowledge about development of new services has been treated within the service marketing and management discourse, where emphasis is put on customer integration in the process, and the co-creation of the value proposition - the service. Despite both knowledge spheres, design and marketing/management, have been deeply involved in the development of new service they have hitherto essentially remained unconnected.

The overall aim of this thesis is to further explore and develop the connections between design and service logic through development of the Design for Service framework. In addition, this thesis takes specific interest in designers’ contribution as intermediaries between users and organizations in service design and innovation. Pragmatist inquiry was used for interlacing theoretical comparisons and explorations in the field to advance the inquiry. A field study of a 10-month collaboration between a design firm and an industrial company, focused on a service design workshop with customers and the outcomes thereof. It was found that the designers worked with users’ stories as design material and rematerialized them as scenarios, instead of through anticipated visualization techniques. Narrative analyses brought forward how designers organized the users’ different accounts into coherent stories and in so doing they highlighted conflicts experienced in the users’ value creation practices. The capacity to propose possible futures is generally argued to be core in design practice, this was however not the strongest contribution in this case. Instead the re-materialization of existing situations was the real contribution. Through interpretation the users’ experience was made relevant and actionable for the industrial company.

This thesis connects research in design practice, user centered design and service logic through development and refinement of a framework - Design for Service. The framework articulates designers’ contribution in terms of value creation. Through this connection designers’ contribution and service design are repositioned from a specific phase of service development to an interpretative core competence for understanding users and value creation in service innovation.

Download dissertation here.
 


2013

Marcus Jahnke, Design

Title
Meaning in the Making: Introducing a hermeneutic perspective on the contribution of design practice to innovation

Tid och plats
Fredagen den 20 september 2013 kl. 13.00 i aulan, HDK - Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Kristinelundsgatan 6-8, Göteborg

Opponent
Professor Roberto Verganti, Politecnico di Milano

Examination Board

  • Professor Maria Nyström, HDK, Göteborg
  • Professor Alexander Styhre, Handelshögskolan, Göteborg
  • Professor Bo Westerlundh, Konstfack, Stockholm

Keywords
design, innovation, design management, hermeneutics, meaning-making, design thinking, design practice

Abstract
Title: Meaning in the Making: Introducing a hermeneutic perspective on the contribution of design practice to innovation
Language: English

ISBN: 978-91-979993-7-3

In recent years interest has grown in how design can contribute to innovation in business and society, such as through the management concept of design thinking. However, up-close studies on design’s contribution to innovation are still scarce. This may be one reason why rhetoric arguing the benefit of design in innovation contexts is often related to pervasive innovation concepts, such as idea generation and problem-solving, rather than to concepts that capture tacit and embodied dimensions of design as an aesthetic practice.

The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of the contribution of design practice to innovation. This has been achieved through an experimental research-approach in which five designers, through different interventions, involved multi-disciplinary groups of non-designers in experiencing design practice “hands-on” in five "non-designerly" companies. The aim of the interventions was to strengthen the innovativeness of the organizations. The interventions have been studied through ethnographically inspired methods and an interpretative and reflexive methodological approach.

In the interventions established product understandings in the companies were challenged, initially leading to friction. However, the immersion in design hands-on meant that established meaning-spaces were gradually expanded through processes of entwined conversation and hands-on making. In these processes new product understandings were developed through aesthetic deliberation and material practice, which in three cases lead to innovative concepts that could not have been developed within the meaning-space in the organization before the interventions. This study thus sheds light on how the emergence of innovative concepts can be understood as processes of meaning-making, and how design practice may provide processes for such innovation work in multi-disciplinary contexts. It also suggests that when design practice is abstracted away, as is common in design thinking rhetoric, relevant dimensions of design’s contribution to innovation may be lost.

The main theoretical contribution is to show the relevance of hermeneutics as an explicit concept for understanding the contribution of design practice to innovation. This can be seen as establishing a missing link between design theory, design management studies and innovation management theory. Beyond articulating the contribution of design practice to innovation, this thesis also supports the relevance of understanding meaning-making as central to innovation.

Download dissertation here.
 


Kim Hedås, Musical Performance and Interpretation

Title
Linjer. Musikens rörelser – komposition i förändring

Time and Place
Lindgrensalen, Artisten, Högskolan för scen och musik, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Opponent
Henrik Frisk, Musician, PhD in Fine Arts in Music, Research Associate at the Royal College of Music, Stockholm

Examination Board

  • Magnus Bärtås, Artist, PhD in Fine Arts, Professor at Konstfack, Stockholm
  • William Brunson, Composer, Professor in Elektro Acoustic Composition at the Royal College of Music, Stockholm
  • Cecilia Roos, Professor in Dance Interpretation at University of Dance and Circus, Stockholm (DOCH)

Keywords
music, composition, relationship, connection, motion, movement, identity, time, memory, space, change, transformation, reflexivity, voice, meaning.

Abstract
Title: Linjer. Musikens rörelser – komposition i förändring
English title: Lines: Music Moving – Composition Changing
Author: Kim Hedås
Language: Swedish, with an English Summary

ISBN: 978-91-979993-6-6

This dissertation takes the shape of a DVD, comprising the music in sixteen compositions, and a book, comprising the dissertation text.

Lines: Music Moving – Composition Changing is a dissertation that focuses on relationships in music. The main question posed in this dissertation is: How does music relate to what is not music? Through an artistic inquiry, where a reflexive movement between the different parts produces the method used, the dissertation addresses the act of composing with particular focus on how music moves and how relations in music change. Results are also in motion, and traces – lines – move, change direction, and connect the music with what is not music.
This inquiry embraces the following five themes: movement, identity, time, memory and space – which all relate to each other, and which, through composition, change, transform and reshape meaning as well as expression.

The aim of this study is to demonstrate the changes that arise as a result of the relationships that are activated between music and what is not music, since an understanding of how these relationships work enables opportunities for the composition of new music.

Download dissertation here.
 


Marco Muñoz, Digital Representation

Title
Infrafaces: Essays on the Artistic Interaction

Time and Place
Friday, 23 August, 13:00 in Glashuset,
Akademin Valand, ingång från Chalmersgatan 4

Exhibition/Perfomance
EXHIBITION by Marco Muñoz
Infrafaces. The paradoxical division of physical and temporal spaces. Gallery Rotor, Valand Academy
OPENING
Wednesday 21st of August 17-21.
GALLERY OPENING HOURS
The exhibition will be shown until Sunday 25th of August.
Thursday - Friday 17-20
Saturday - Sunday 12-17

Opponent
Docent Ylva Gislén, gästprofessor i konstnärlig gestaltning, Lunds universitets konstnärliga fakultet

Examination Board

  • Docent Karl Palmås, Teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Chalmers
  • Fil dr Monica Sand, konstnär, gästforskare vid Arkitekturmuseet, Stockholm
  • Fil dr Magnus Bärtås, konstnär, professor vid Konstfack, Stockholm

Keywords
interaction, artistic research, digital art, infrafaces, interface, paradoxes, art and technology.

Abstract
Title: Infrafaces: Essays on the Artistic Interaction
Swedish title: Infrafaces: Essäer om den konstnärliga interaktionen
Language: English, with a Swedish and Spanish summary

ISBN: 978-91-979993-5-9
The essays collected in this dissertation introduce a new concept in the field of interactive art: the concept of infrafaces.
This thesis shows how a new zone is discovered when two or more elements connect. In the space that arises, a contact area comes into being between the elements involved, and this takes place at the moment of their contact and information exchange – forming an interface. This interface can in turn be manipulated to generate a new space, which forms a contact zone that can be opened even further, thus creating new spaces. The new segments created within the practice of interactivity are named infrafaces.

Infrafaces are a series of interrelated interfaces within an interaction that adapt time and/or space to transform connecting elements into new spaces. These spaces act as an interface for the next transformation to take place before a new space is opened. The infraface is an artistic interpretation of the process of interactivity and has the ability to expand the time or the space in between the elements interacting, in order to embed new stories between them.

This dissertation explains how, by means of artistic experimentation – through video, installations and the design of interfaces – this new area was uncovered: an area that is an infinite zone, close to the paradoxical, but that offers endless opportunities to develop art, and instead of solving the paradoxes that arise in art or technology, develops a way to use these contradictions to create a different understanding of our relation to the world.

This thesis also proposes a new approach to the relationship between art and technology, hereby manifesting the ways in which our senses adapt to technology. Instead of pretending to define and change the world, this project proposes new forms of connectivity that produce different interactive applications and whose aim is to produce new knowledge.

This dissertation presents five essays interwoven with artistic exhibitions, and also includes the documentations of these experienced practices, demonstrating the literary and visual potential of the infraface – a new concept within artistic research.

Download dissertation here.
 


Fredrik Nyberg, Literary Composition, Poetry and Prose

Title
Hur låter dikten? - Att bli ved II

Time and place
Friday, 24 May, 13:00, in Schildknechtsalen (Teater 2), Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Fil. dr Jesper Olsson, forskarassistent vid Linköpings universitet

Examination Board

  • Thomas Götselius – fil. dr i litteraturvetenskap, biträdande lektor vid Stockholms universitet.
  • Maria Bania – musiker och fil. dr i musikalisk gestaltning, lektor vid Högskolan för scen och musik.
  • Tommy Olofsson – författare, docent i litteraturvetenskap, lektor vid Linnéuniversitetet.

Keywords
Poetry reading, poetry performance, oral reading, silent reading, sound similarities, sound poetry, text-sound composition, ways-of-writing, self-representation, loop, the line of poetry

Abstract
Title: Hur låter dikten? Att bli ved II
English title: What is the sound of the poem. Becoming Firewood II
Language: Swedish, with an English Summary
ISBN: 978-91-979948-2-8

This dissertation also includes the collection of poems Att bli ved and a CD-record.

This project revolves around the question raised by its title. The dissertation consists of an investigation of the culture of poetry-reading and how it has established itself in modern times, and what characterises this practice. The second half of the first chapter revolves around a number of poetry readings given by me some years ago. This chapter concludes by the concept of poetry reading being defined as something essentially different from other types of sonic poetic practices which goes under the name “poetry performance”. In the second chapter of the dissertation the focus shifts over to this kind of performative acts that became an important part of art and literary life during the 20th century. A movement is identified through which for example Ilmar Laaban and Sten Hanson abandons conventional modes of literary expression in order to seek out and stage various sound poetry and performance activities. In the concluding chapter, two of my own works are in focus. The first part is a discussion of the CD ADSR that just like the compositions on the record seeks to embrace a great many aspects. As it progresses, this essay also changes character and becomes more narrative in its mode. Since storytelling has always been something foreign to me as a writer, it is possible to regard this fragment of prose as yet another laboratory study of the significance of ways of writing in a practice aimed at producing knowledge. The last section of the dissertation discusses the collection of poems Att bli ved, where a number of key concepts such as: sound similarities; loops, metre and rhythm; and a line of poetry, act as a point of departure. All these elements constitute important contributions in the different attempts to produce the poems.

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Per Högberg, Music Interpretation

Time and place
Saturday 13 April 2013 in Vasakyrkan, Gothenburgh at 11.00 and in i Lindgrensalen, Artisten at 13.00.

Opponent
Professor Peter Peitsalo, Sibelius-Akademin, Helsingfors

Examination Board

  • Professor Oloph Bexell, Teologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet
  • Fil. dr Karin Johansson, Musikhögskolan i Malmö, Lunds universitet
  • Professor Karin Nelson, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet

Keywords
Musical performance, Congregational song, Interaction, Participation, Liturgy, Beauty, User perspective, Function, Tradition, Organ, Song, Horizontality and verticality

Abstract
Organ Singing and Hymn Playing. Performing Congregational Song. The Lutheran church service tradition assigns important functions to the organ: in liturgical use, most of all as a leader, a source of inspiration, and a conversational partner in the congregation’s song. In our time, however, the congregational song repertoire is marked by pluralism; it spans styles and genres. This being the case, does the music historian Abraham Hülphers’ famous statement of 1773,”thus organs’ use in Swedish Zion also ought to be praised/ So long as their pipes’ sound may guide the Church’s song” still possess validity for the performance of hymns today? The present Swedish Hymnal contains much material that has been included ever since our first official hymnal, the Carolingian hymnal of 1695. Thus, in spite of revisions made to language, melodies and harmonizations, there is still an uninterrupted and living tradition of congregational song in the liturgy of the Church of Sweden. Congregational song exhibits elements of conscious art, and at the same time engenders shared participation. This participation arises as that which is conscious of art (the text, the organ, and the trained organist) meets that which is unconscious of art (the singing congregation, the “folk”), and can itself be described as artistic beauty. The organ, its music, and its concert practice provide endless examples of conscious art. But how might shared participation in congregational song, which belongs to the perspective of the organ’s liturgical utility, be described in relation to the concept of conscious art? Using as a point of departure a description of the verticality and horizontality of congregational song, this dissertation seeks to formulate a pedagogical approach. Bringing the liturgical use perspective into focus in relation to congregational song is essential to formulating a notion of this song in terms of artistic beauty, which offers us a deepened understanding of that utility as tradition in motion, or motion in tradition. Keywords: Musical performance, Congregational song, Interaction, Participation, Liturgy, Beauty, User perspective, Function, Tradition, Organ, Song, Horizontality and verticality.

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Sten Sandell, Music Interpretation

Time and place
Thursday March 7 2013, at 13.00, in Lindgrensalen,
Academy of Music and Drama, Artisten

Opponent
Konstn dr Stefan Östersjö, biträdande lektor i konstnärlig forskning vid Musikhögskolan i Malmö, postdokforskare vid Orpheus Insitute, Gent, Belgien

Examination Board

  • Fil dr Catharina Dyrssen, professor i arkitektur, institutionen för arkitektur, Chalmers
  • Efva Lilja, professor, Dans- och cirkushögskolan, Stockholm
  • Per Mårtensson, tonsättare, konstnärlig ledare för Gotlands tonsättarskola

Keywords
Direction, the way of playing, character of a room, dialogue, process, sonic langu¬age, sensitivity, compositions, textual material, integration of text and music

Abstract
Title: På insidan av tystnaden – en undersökning
English title: Music On the Inside of Silence - a Study
Language: Swedish, with an English Summary

ISBN: 978-91-979993-3-5
This thesis also includes a CD-box with music.

How can I through musical improvisation change the course of interaction between music, space and text? The aim of my doctoral project is, on the basis of the various conditions a room or a space has to offer, to study the uniqueness of improvised music to be able to chan¬ge the direction of a music composition in real time, with focus on the integration of text and music. The following questions are also addressed: how can one identify the effect a room has on how a voice or instrument sounds, and how can one create a unique world of sound in that same room with the intention of creating a new kind of aural drama. The main empirical data for this project will consist of a number of case studies in the form of: a series of experiments/ improvisations - that trigger a series of processes - that again trigger a series of methods. Free improvised music is the only form of music that allows me, as a musician, to be able to change direction at any time. Free improvised music is the only form of music where I can completely change my way of playing depending on the character of the room or the space. The room be¬comes a co-player that I can either go along with or resist. In my project I investigate different ways to explore and clarify how changes of direction in free improvisation can be performed and how the spatial conditions and other conditions affect the way the music is played. The form of improvised music I am examining is extremely dialogue-oriented, where action and reaction within the dialogue in the room play a vital role in the process. What I would like to try out and demonstrate is how a sonic language entirely based on the participants’ sensitivity can be moulded, i.e. a language that is altogether based on the listening and playing of a person in a particular space.

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2012

Ulrika Wänström Lindh, Design

Title
Light Shapes Spaces: Experience of Distribution of Light and Visual Spatial Boundaries

Time and Place
Thursday December 13, at 13.15 in Sal 10, the University main building, Vasaparken, Gothenburg

Opponent
Dr Kevin Mansfield, Course Director Msc Light & Lighting, Faculty of the Built Environment, The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, London, UK

Examination Board

  • Karin Sodergaard, Lektor, Institut 2/Institut for Teknologi, Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole, Köpenhamn, DK
  • Karin Wagner, Universitetslektor, institutionen för Tillämpad IT, IT-fakulteten, GU/Chalmers
  • Jan Ejhed, Professor Linnéuniversitetet/lektor, Skolan för Teknik och hälsa, KTH

Abstract
Light enables us to experience space. The distribution of light is vital for spatial experience but has not been the main focus of previous research on lighting. The lighting designer’s professional knowledge is to a great extent experience-based and tacit. With design practice as the point of departure, this thesis aims to explore spatiality and enclosure in relation to the distribution of light – with the intention of increasing subjects’ understanding of what can be regarded as a space, and to show how spaces can be shaped by the distribution of light. By focusing on users’ experiences and interpretations, relationships between the distribution of light and perceived spatial dimensions and experienced spatial atmosphere have been investigated. The main contribution of this thesis is to widen the base of knowledge that lighting designers, architects and customers can use as a common reference.

This thesis is based on three studies: the Scale Model Study, the Auditorium Study and the Church Park Study. The thesis includes concept- and method development. The mixed methodologies comprise a range from introspective phenomenological observations to deep interviews and questionnaires. The experimental setups have also shifted from scale models to real-life interior and exterior settings. Consequently, a quantitative approach has complemented the mainly qualitative approach. Through artistically based research, patterns and relationships are dealt with in complex real spaces.

The findings of these studies lead to a discussion of when, why and how patterns of brightness and darkness influence spatial perceptions of dimensions. The findings also show that brightness not only contributes to our experiencing a space as more spacious than it really is, but in certain situations brightness can actually have the reverse effect. Furthermore, darkness can contribute to a spacious impression, which has hardly been discussed in previous research. What subjects regard as a space may shift between the clearly defined physical space and the perceived space, which include light zones. Light zones can create a sense of inclusion or exclusion for subjects, which affects their sense of community and their feeling of safety. Light topography, e.g. the height of luminaire positions, as well as light direction influence the way we experience the private and the public. Enclosure can, if related to visible spatial boundaries, facilitate reassurance and safety.

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Anniqa Lagergren, estetiska uttrycksformer med inriktning mot utbildningsvetenskap

Title
Barns musikkomponerande i tradition och förändring

Time and Place
Fredag 7 september kl 10.00, Lingsalen (A505), Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Professor Petter Dyndahl, Høgskolen i Hedmark, Norge

Examination Board

  • Sture Brändström, professor i musikpedagogik vid institutionen för musik och media, Luleå universitet
  • Fil dr Karin Nelson, lektor i solistisk orgel och orgelimprovisation vid Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet
  • Ingegerd Rydin, professor i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap vid Högskolan i Halmstad

Abstract
This thesis focuses on education at Swedish community music and arts schools and at primary schools. The aim of the study is to contribute to knowledge formation within the field of music education by examining how children make music in an institutional context and how the development of new approaches in teaching and learning affect how children practise music. This is studied by observing what happens when children aged 9 to 12, compose music when they have access to digital tools in a community music and arts school and in a primary school – with specific focus on how composing tasks take shape under varying contextual and interpersonal conditions. 13 children from a community music and arts school and 21 children from a primary school participated in the study. In order to gather material for this study a survey was undertaken to examine the children’s experiences of music, instruments and digital tools. In order to observe and examine composing activities and the music the children had composed, these sessions were recorded on video. The theoretical framework for the study is based on a sociocultural perspective. The results indicate contextual-related differences between the activities in the community music and arts school and the primary school. The differences are observed in the activities and the music the children compose. By addressing interpersonal-related differences the reason why some groups of children undertake the task of composing and some groups of children do not undertake this task can be examined further.

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Martin Avila, Design

Title
Devices. On Hospitality, Hostility and Design

Time and Place
20 April 2012 at 1.pm at Glashuset (The ‘Glass House’, in the Inner Court Yard at the Valand School of Fine Art, entrance from Chalmersgatan). An exhibition is included in the public defence

Opponent
Professor Andrew Morrison, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO)

Examination Board

  • Professor Barbara Czarniawska, School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg University
  • Professor Johan Redström, Institute of Design, Umeå University
  • PhD Alex Wilkie, Goldsmiths University of London

Keywords
Device, hospitality, hostility, design, languaging, acci- dent, ecology, symbiosis, autopoiesis, umwelt.

Abstract
This thesis studies and speculates upon the interrelations of ar- tefacts with human and nonhuman agents. These interrelations form assemblages, some of which have emergent properties, be- coming manifestations of processes that we cannot fully control or understand.

The work started by exploring the theme of hospitality and hostility with the ambition to better understand the ecological complexity of the design process and its results.

As an assemblage, this work combines different literary, phil- osophical and theoretical discourses and traditions with experi- mental design in order to develop and articulate the concept of device. A device organizes, arranges, frames our environment and thereby defines and limits possibilities of relation.

Since relations can only be thought through a so-called natu- ral language such as English, they must be taken into considera- tion through the process of languaging, understood by Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela as “communication about com- munication”, and as the most characteristic feature of the human species. My focusing on linguistic and biological phenomena is a response to this concern, in an attempt to understand how this process influences our perception of the world.

Through a series of design projects, the thesis examines the potential range of an artefact’s relations. It does so by exploring grammatical associations that affect design conceptualizations, creating tools (prepositiontools) as well as studying and articulat- ing forms of symbiosis that an artefact might develop in and with its environment (¡Pestes!).

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Lena Dahlén, scenisk gestaltning

Title
I go from reading to performing. Descriptions from a monologue practice

Time and Place
January 30 2012, Schildknechtteatern, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Karin Helander, Stockholm University

Keywords
acts, art of acting, artistic research, detail, habitual practice, monologue, performing, performing space, practical knowledge, presence, reading

Abstract
English title: I go from reading to performing. Descriptions from a monologue practice
Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-7844-840-1

I go from reading to performing. Descriptions from a monologue practice is a dissertation based on an actor’s work with monologues. The path of work is traced and described from a practitioner’s perspective. Concrete examples are used and examined in order to ‘sift out’ and expose the specific conditions this work involves.

The dissertation follows the path from reading to performing, where one person, as in a monologue, is the speaker. It consists of three parts. In the first part the given circumstances of the path to performance are described. The questions that are posed along the way include: What role does the audience play? What significance does the performing space have for performance expression? How is a written text read, lived through, reshaped and transferred to performance?

The second part is based on, and delimits, the search for a “living” performance. And what is that? What is presence? What different past and present acts does the actor have to relate to? What does rehearsing, what does ‘acquiring habitual practice’, involve? Habitual practice as a condition for change and as a condition for the unexpected and for the spontaneous is portrayed. The significance of detail for the performance and for the particularity of the performance is also described.

The dissertation’s first and second part lead on to the third part, which exemplifies the particular. This is followed by rehearsals of Samuel Beckett’s play Happy Days. Here, the actor’s searching sheds its light on the dissertation’s earlier reflections.

That reflection is based on practice and that it is examples that are used to capture, in writing, a fleeting path that disappears in an actor’s steps, is a part of the study’s task – and a result. To examine and convey something of the transient nature of this work from a practitioner’s perspective is its aim.

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2011

Katarina A. Karlsson, Music Interpretation

Title
Think’st thou to seduce me then? Impersonating female personas in songs by Thomas Campion (1567-1620)

Time and Place
9 December 2011, Högskolan för scen och musik, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Christopher R Wilson, professor, fil dr., University of Hull, Great Britain

Keywords
Thomas Campion, lute songs, female personas, gender, same sex desire, musical interpretation, Overbury, artistic research, arrangements for female vocal quartet

Abstract
Title: Think’st thou to seduce me then? Female personas in songs by Thomas Campion (1567-1620)
Language: English with a Swedish summary

This dissertation is in the field of Artistic Research in Music Interpretation. It is a study of songs with female personas written by Thomas Campion, investigated through performance practice and a critical reading of historical research carried out on the English Renaissance. The study is inspired by gender- and queer theory and looks at the function of the songs within their socio-cultural context. Since the songs seems to have been used and performed in a homosocial society, the study also discusses the possibility of male bonding and same-sex desire as part of the songs’ hidden or overt messages.

The dissertation consists of a thesis in two parts, a newly-made transcription from the original lute tablature of the fourteen chosen songs, and a CD-recording, documenting different modes of interpretation, including the following accompaniments for the songs: a clavichord, tuned in meantone, a positive organ tuned in meantone, a modern guitar and a female vocal quartet. Four of the arrangements for female vocal quartet are also included in the transcription appendix.

The aim of the dissertation is to find out how the songs worked in their society and what impact their historical function can have on a contemporary musical practice. The aim is also to find hidden layers of the songs and try to make these layers come alive in musical practice today.

The act of singing is used as means of inquiry. Part two of the thesis describes how a singer can work with contradicting stories behind the songs in order to make the music come alive. In the transcriptions, discrepancies between earlier editions and Campion’s original music have also been found and corrected.

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Per Anders Nilsson, Music Interpretation

Title
A Field of Possibilities: Designing and Playing Digital Musical Instruments

Time and Place
25 November 2011, Lindgrensalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Robert Rowe. Ph D. Professor of Music and Associate Director of the Music Technology program at New York University.

Examination Board

  • Christian Munthe. Fil dr. Professor vid institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori, Göteborgs universitet
  • Karin Nelson. Fil dr. Lektor vid Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet
  • Ingemar Fridell. Fil dr. Lektor vid Musikhögskolan i Malmö

Abstract
This thesis focuses on a set of digital musical instruments which Per Anders Nilsson has designed and developed with ensemble improvisation in mind. The intention is not to create a universal improvisational instrument, but rather to create a set of instruments which each realize one musical idea. His research addresses the meaning and relations between activities at design time and activities at play time. In short, design time deals with conception, representation, and articulation of ideas and knowledge outside of time, whereas play time is about embodied knowledge, bodily activity, and interaction in real time. In this work, aesthetics play a crucial role; at design time personal aesthetic preferences guide the design process, whereas in play time, a major aesthetic tenet is that musical improvisation has strong similarities to gaming, play, and sports.

One hypothesis states that choices made during the design process at the development stages of a digital musical instrument significantly influence ensemble improvisation and musical results at play time. Given that a musical instrument in its use actualizes the aesthetic decisions of its designer, in cases where the designer and player are one, during play there will be a double influence: directly through the player’s actions, and indirectly through the nature of the instrument. Each instrument constitutes a field of possibilities, and every performance makes the instrument an actuality, but is itself only complementary to all possible other performances with that instrument.

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Tina Carlsson, Fine Arts

Title
the sky is blue

Time and place
28 October 2011, Stadsbibliotekets hörsal, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Milou Allerholm, Kungliga Konsthögskolan, Stockholm

Examination Board

  • Ulla Holm, professor emerita i genusvetenskap vid institutionen för kulturvetenskaper/genusvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet
  • Nils Olsson, Fil dr i litteraturvetenskap, Inst för litteratur, idéhistoria och religion, Göteborgs universitet
  • Mike Bode, Fil dr i fri konst, konstnär

Keywords
Feyerabend, story, subjective, sky, change

Abstract
Title: the sky is blue
English title: the sky is blue
Language: Swedish

Through its works the sky is blue wants to show that both institutional and subjective limitations are present in our lives but that we also have the ability to go beyond these limitations by way of our dreams, our fantasies and our visions. Tina Carlsson maintain that this ability, which is built into the title’s adamant claim that the sky is blue, carries within it the possibility to change the present. However, knowledge and understanding of the now is also needed for change. the sky is blue wants to show how the individual experience and the subjective story are productive and necessary parts of the formation of that knowledge. The particular, or the individual experience, is central to the works in the sky is blue.

the sky is blue contains photographic works, artworks and textual works. The three works “jag samlar på himlar, jag samlar på himlen” (I collect skies, I collect the sky), “1000 stories about a blue sky” and “under en himmel” (under a sky) are the point of departure for the dissertation and its central works. A subjective story that seeks the answer to the question why I do what I do forms itself around these works. By choosing the same method in the dissertation work as in the artistic practice Tina Carlsson let the question intervene with the question. This means that the dissertation the sky is blue, which has come into being in the search for a why, is an implicit answer to the question: what I do when I do what I do.

In “två bakgrundstexter” (two background texts) is described how two losses have formed the conditions for the coming into being of the sky is blue. There is a series of micro-essays related to the “two background texts”, which, instead of looking backward, take their point of departure in the present. In “tolv betraktelser” (twelve reflections/discourses) everyday flow is central; in these texts come the thoughts and reflections on expressions that take up space when I am confronted with different events in my everyday life. The texts in “fyra verkbeskrivningar” (four descriptions of works) are written in intimate relation to the works, and are, instead of reports on the material of the works and their coming into being, portrayals of the personal “state” that are the points of departure for these works.

Just like the personal experience, which never forms itself in a linear way but rather consists of different parts or wanderings here and there that correspond to each other, the sky is blue is built up of different parts that are situated in a dialogical situation with each other. In order to maintain the dialogue between the different parts of the dissertation, Tina Carlsson has chosen not to use the book format, which, in most cases, invites linear reading; the different parts of the dissertation have been placed in a box instead. The dialogical situation between the works does not only correspond to her artistic practice; she also consider the former to nurture the methods that are used to convey knowledge and meaning within the arts.

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Lars Wallsten, Digital Representation

Title
Notes on Traces. Photography. Evidence. Image.

Time and place
27 May 2011, Universitetets huvudbyggnad, Vasaparken, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Per-Magnus Johansson, professor at Gothenburg University

Examination Board

  • Lars O Ericsson, docent i praktisk filosofi (Stockholms universitet), författare, konstkritiker och konstskribent
  • Kent Klich, fotograf, Köpenhamn
  • Peter Ullmark, arkitekt, professor (Chalmers; Göteborgs universitet)

Keywords
Photography, evidence, trace, pattern, condensation, art, criminalistics.

Abstract
Swedish title: Anteckningar om Spår. Fotografi–Bevis–Bild.
English title: Notes on Traces. Photography. Evidence. Image.
Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-978477-3-5

Anteckningar om Spår (Notes on Traces) is a self-critical and self-reflective practice-based PhD project. It endeavours to make visible how artistic practice can create its content and context in relation to experience, reinterpretation and further progression.

The project is an inquiry into photography’s capacity to prove evidence. It is structured around photographic representation and written text. The dissertation consists of four photographic works together with an introduction, a list of contents, and a main text presented as an essay with numbered passages. The research effort is guided by a broad, selective inquiry. Contextualisation and conceptualisation have been identified through a process of bricolage, whereby creative use has been made of different discourses such as photography, film, art, philosophy, psychology, education, law, criminalistics, literature and cognitive science. Artistic strategies and practices that use forensic aesthetics are also discussed.

The method has the character of tracing a trail that leads the project forward. This creates a dialogue between the content and the form of the dissertation. Trace together with condensation and pattern are presented as productive concepts; these concepts, which in some respects have their roots in photography, not only provide others with the leads to understand a photograph as evidential proof but are also characterised by a suggestive quality, which is a recurring feature in the photographic projects.

The study contributes to overcoming the differences in the ways theoretical and practical knowledge are produced.

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Andreas Gedin, Fine Arts

Title
I Hear Voices in Everything – Step by Step

Time and place
28 May 2011 Sjöströmsalen, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Jan Håfström, artist, Stockholm

Examination Board

  • Gunnar D Hansson, författare, poet, essäist, översättare och docent i litteraturvetenskap samt professor i litterär gestaltning, Göteborgs universitet
  • Jan Kaila, professor, Bildkonstakademin, Helsingfors
  • Ulrika Ferm, curator och konstnär

Keywords
Mikhail Bakhtin, Michail Bachtin, curating, curator, exhibition, intertextuality, metalinguistics, carnival, dialog, essay, conceptual art, contemporary art, artistic research.

Abstract
Title: Jag hör röster överallt – Step by Step
English title: I Hear Voices in Everything – Step by Step
Language: Swedish

ISBN: ISBN 978-91-978477-2-8

I Hear Voices in Everything – Step by Step, is a practise-based dissertation in fine arts. It includes three art exhibitions, several independent art works and an essay. It discusses the role of the artist and the making of art mainly through the ideas of the Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin (1875-1975) but also by reflecting on similarities between the artist and the curator. Being a dissertation in fine arts, the aim is not primarily to develop any certain philosophy but to use theory to discuss art, and vice versa.

In the first section, the methodological presuppositions are articulated and contextualised. The relevance of artistic research as a means to develop artistic practice and as a means to increase the understanding of artistic practice is also addressed, as is the reasonability of using the philosophy of Bakhtin in this specific context. Bakhtin is usually referred to as a literary theorist; however, his dialogical philosophy concerns man’s being as a whole, that is, it is through dialogical relations man is constituted. Here, man, and also art in general, is understood by Bakhtin as being temporary meeting places for art works, readers, artists, protagonists, history etc. The reflective text in itself also endeavours to be dialogical and polyphonic by including different voices such as fictional characters, real comments, emails, letters and quotes.

In the second section the practice of making art is discussed in relation to Bakhtin and other writers. One main topic is if one, by using Bakhtin, can also regard an art work as a meeting place for language (in its broad sense) so as to include physical material, skill, and experience; and hence, if one could, or should, regard the artist as a kind of curator, and vice versa. Bearing this in mind, is there then any relevant difference between organising language into an artwork or into an exhibition?

The third section focuses on the artworks that are a part of the PhD
project; these include an exhibition and two planned exhibitions. The
central theme of, or the catalyst for, the works of art is repetition.
Published as one exclusive copy, and also smuggled into the Lenin
library, Sleeper is a collection of essays on the ingredients of a tuna fish casserole. Thessaloniki revisited is a video of a reading of a short story.

Spin-Off is a video where a curse is read by an actor. Sharing a Square is a documentary-based video of a ritual drumming session in Calanda, Spain, and Erich P. is an artwork based on an embassy to Russia in 1673 and on contra-factual archaeology. As a final part of the dissertation project these artworks will be shown in a solo exhibition, and there will also be a curated exhibition, which will include only other artists.

The last part of the dissertation’s title “Step by Step” refers to a larger art project called Taking Over, which this dissertation is a part of. Taking Over deals with different aspects of power relations in five separate projects. Being an integral part of this larger and thematic art project, the dissertation also refers to different aspects of power, and even to the lack of power in relation to the artist’s position in research contexts, both inside and outside academia. It also underlines that artistic research is part of a wider artistic practice.

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Elisabeth Belgrano, scenisk gestaltning

Title
“Lasciatemi morire” o farò “La Finta Pazza”: Embodying Vocal Nothingness on Stage in Italian and French 17th century Operatic Laments and Mad Scenes. 

Time and place
June 1 2011, Lindgrensalen, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
John Potter, fil dr, sångare, Great Britain

Examination Board

  • Barbro Smeds, Stockholms dramatiska högskola
  • Magnus Tessing Schneider, Köpenhamn
  • Johannes Landgren, professor, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet

Keywords
voice, singing, nothingness, je-ne-sais-quoi, 17th century opera, pure voice, lamentation, madness, passions, emotions, nightingale, transformation, ornamentation, observation, improvisation, vocal expression, embodiment, creative process, performance, repetition, movement, inner images, artistic research

Abstract
Title: “Lasciatemi morire” o farò “La Finta Pazza”: Embodying Vocal Nothingness on Stage in Italian and French 17th century Operatic Laments and Mad Scenes.
Language: English with a Swedish summary

ISBN: 978-91-978477-4-2

This music research drama thesis explores and presents a singer’s artistic research process from the first meeting with a musical score until the first steps of the performance on stage. The aim has been to define and formulate an understanding in sound as well as in words around the concept of pure voice in relation to the performance of 17th century vocal music from a 21st century singer’s practice-based perspective with reference to theories on Nothingness, the role of the 17th century female singer, ornamentation (over-vocalization) and the singing of the nightingale. The music selected for this project is a series of lamentations and mad scenes from Italian and French 17th century music dramas and operas allowing for deeper investigation of differences and similarities in vocal expression between these two cultural styles.

The thesis is presented in three parts: a Libretto, a performance of the libretto (DVD) and a Cannocchiale (that is, a text following the contents of the Libretto). In the libretto the singer’s immediate inner images, based on close reading of the musical score have been formulated and performed in words, but also recorded and documented in sound and visual format, as presented in the performance on the DVD. In the Cannocchiale, the inner images of the singer’s encounter with the score have been observed, explored, questioned, highlighted and viewed in and from different perspectives.

The process of the singer is embodied throughout the thesis by Mind, Voice and Body, merged in a dialogue with the Chorus of Other, a vast catalogue of practical and theoretical references including an imagined dialogue with two 17th century singers. As a result of this study, textual reflections parallel to vocal experimentation have led to a deeper understanding of the importance of considering the concept of Nothingness in relation to Italian 17th century vocal music practice, as suggested in musicology. The concept of Je-ne-sais-quoi in relation to the interpretation of French 17th century vocal music, approached from the same performance methodology and perspective as has been done with the Italian vocal music, may provide a novel approach for exploring the complexity involved in the creative process of a performing artist.

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Christian Wideberg, Educational Science of Fine Arts

Title
The Challenge of Studio Critiques – A Perspective of Growth

Time and place
June 10 2011, Universitetets huvudbyggnad, Vasaparken, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Arnt Myrstad, professor at Tromsø universitet, Norway

Examination Board

  • Finn Thorbjörn Hansen, fil. dr, lektor i pedagogik vid DPU, Århus universitet
  • Gunilla Bandolin, professor i fri konst, Konstfack
  • Lars Mouwitz, docent i matematisk bildning vid Göteborgs universitet samt professor i yrkeskunnande vid Linnéuniversitetet

Keywords
Bildung, Educational Science, Fine Arts, Growth, Higher Education, Phenomenological Hermeneutical Method, Studio Art, Studio Critiques, Supervision

Abstract
Title: Ateljésamtalets utmaning - ett bildningsperspektiv
English title: The Challenge of Studio Critiques – A Perspective of Growth (German: Bildung)
Language: Swedish with an English summary

ISBN 978-91-978477-5-9

The present study is in the field of Educational Science and is an investigation of the studio critiques i.e. the teacher/student studio interactions that take place as part of two higher education programmes in the Fine Arts in Sweden; these are the three-year Bachelor of Fine Arts programme and the two-year Master of Fine Arts programme.

The aim of the dissertation is to find out what is essentially important in a studio critique, to understand its context and integrity, as well as to examine how a teacher captures the opportunities and challenges that occur within the force field of the student’s intention, of his or her idea and his or her formal knowledge.

A phenomenological hermeneutical method is applied as the method of inquiry in the study, where several different collecting methods are used to gather empirical data. An historical overview, transcribed interviews, a log book and studio critiques make up the narrative text data, which have both practical and scientific relevance. The core theme of the studio critique is to challenge the quality of the student’s artistic expression, thus contributing to involving him or her in a process of growth; this process embraces the potential of the studio critique to nurture and attain quality, which is the main result of the study.

Studio critiques are complex and interwoven interactions of two kinds: 1) interactions where the teacher and the student seek common ground in a mutual process of understanding and accord, and 2) interactions where the integration of intention and quality is strived for. In his or her role as supervisor, the teacher aims at finding the point of interface between the student’s intention and the material qualities of his or her work. Ultimately the goal of this form of growth (German: Bildung) is to maximise student potential, thus enabling him or her to develop the full range of his or her talents. When the main topic for the studio critique is found, another interaction begins. This process addresses the challenge of integrating concept and material, the ultimate goal of which must be a seamless fusion of the two if the finished work is to possess sublime qualities. One can regard the studio critique as a process where the student reaches a deeper knowledge of self and his or her artistic goals, where subjective and creative impulses are essential for the developmental growth of this form of living knowledge.

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Cecilia Björck, Music Education

Title
Claiming Space: Discourses on Gender, Popular Music, and Social Change

Time and place
25 February 2011, Academy of Music and Drama/Högskolan för scen och musik, University of Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Lars Lilliestam, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Faculty of Art, University of Gothenburg

Examination Board

  • Professor Petter Dyndahl, Avdeling for lærerutdanning og naturvitenskap, Institutt for kunstfag og informasjonsvitenskap, Hedmark University College, Norway
  • Professor Elisabeth Öhrn, Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, University of Gothenburg
  • Professor Hillevi Ganetz, Center for Gender Studies, Stockholm University

Chair person of the Public Defence
Professor Claes Ericsson, Academy of Music and Drama

Keywords
space, spatiality, popular music, girls, women, gender, social change, agency, music education, discourse analysis

Abstract
Title: Claiming Space: Discourses on Gender, Popular Music, and Social Change
Swedish title: Att ta plats: diskurser om genus, populärmusik och social förändring
Language: English
ISBN: 978-91-978477-1-1

This compilation (portfolio) thesis explores how language is used in the context of gender-equity music initiatives to construct ideas about gender, popular music, and social change. More specifically, it examines the use of spatial metaphors and concepts revolving round the idea that girls and women need to “claim space” to participate in popular music practices. The empirical material consists of recorded round-table discussions with staff and participants from four different initiatives in Sweden, all with the explicit aim to increase the number of girls and women involved in popular music production and performance. They include a time-limited project by a youth organization, a grass-roots network for young musicians, an adult education course, and a pop/rock music camp for girls. A Foucault-inspired discourse analysis method in six stages was used to examine the data in terms of discursive constructions, discourses, action orientation, positionings, practice, and subjectivity. The results are organized in four themes – Sound, Body, Territory, and Room – and are discussed in relation to the concepts of performativity (Judith Butler), feminine body spatiality (Iris Marion Young), and gaze (Michel Foucault and others). The idea of “claiming space” is found to be involved in two dialectics. The first dialectic is formed by space-claiming understood as on the one hand extrovert self-promotion to be seen and heard, and on the other hand, as introvert focus on the musical craft. A second dialectic is formed by an ongoing struggle between empowerment and objectification, i.e., between being an acting subject and being the object of a disciplining gaze.

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2010

Cecilia Wallerstedt, Music

Title
Pointing Out the Invisible in Motion: A Didactic Study on Time in Music.

Time and Place
29 October 2010, Lingsalen, Högskolan för scen och musik at the University of Gothenburg, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Mikael Alexandersson, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, University of Gothenburg

Examination Board

  • Lektor Monica Lindgren, Högskolan för scen och musik
  • Docent Sonja Sheridan, Institutionen för kommunikation och lärande, University of Gothenburg
  • Professor Christer Wiklund, Institutionen för musik och medier, Luleå University

Chair Person at the public defence
Professor Bengt Olsson, Högskolan för scen och musik

Keywords
listening skills, early childhood education, music listening,
variation theory, learning study, children’s perspective, metre

Abstract
Title: Att peka ut det osynliga i rörelse: En didaktisk studie av taktart i musik.
English title: Pointing Out the Invisible in Motion: A Didactic Study on Time in Music.
Language: Swedish
ISBN: 978-91-978477-0-4

The aim of this study is to examine what constitutes being able to discern time in music, as seen from the learner’s perspective. Listening is not only regarded as a higher mental process but also as a core skill in musical ability. Participants in the empirical study are 3 teachers and 27 children in a preschool class and in primary school. Three lessons aimed at facilitating children’s ability to discern time are analysed. The data also consists of interviews with the children.

The theoretical framework for the study is variation theory. Four critical aspects of the object of learning have become apparent: to be able to discern stressed beats, the auditory meaning of keeping time and the continuous aspect of pulse; of critical importance is also to be able to separate the metrical aspect of the music from different forms of representing it, such as clapping or drumming.

It is suggested that mediating tools, such as time, constitute important learning objects in music education. The teacher’s task is to point out what is invisible in the music and also what is invisible to the children. This can be done with the help of visual representations of auditory aspects, patterns of variation and verbal dialogue.

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Magnus Bärtås, Fine Arts

Title
You Told Me - work stories and video essays / verkberättelser och videoessäer

Time and Place
28 May 2010, Hörsalen, Göteborgs stadsbibliotek, Götaplatsen 3, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Dr Suzana Milevska, professor vid Accademia Italiana, Makedonien

Examination Board

  • Anna Sofia Rossholm, lektor Linnéuniversitetet, Kalmar/Växjö
  • Maria Lantz, lektor, Kungl. Konsthögskolan, Stockholm
  • Staffan Söderholm, professor, litterär gestaltning, Göteborgs universitet 

Keywords
Video essay/filmic essay, conceptual art, biography, storytelling, work story­/verkberättelse, narrator, voice-over, post-construction, narratology, reenactment, Chris Marker, Choi Eun-hee

Abstract
Title: You Told Me – work stories and video essays / verkberättelser och videoessäer
Language: Swedish and English
ISBN: 978-91-977758-8-5

You Told Me is a practice-based research project and consists of three video biographies (the Who is…? series), and two video essays (Kumiko, Johnnie Walker & the Cute (2007), Madame & Little Boy (2009), an introduction with a contextualization and methodology of the field, and three essays. The dissertation is an observation and analysis of certain functions and meanings of narration and narratives in contemporary art, as well as being an experiment with roles, methods, actions, and narrative functions in an artistic medium – the video essay. Using the methods of “pilgrimage” (Chris Marker) and essayistic practices, and by revisiting and retelling biographies, this work tries to find a place in between collective and personal memory. During the practical process and the reflective theoretical work the different elements or instances of the video essay are identified: the subject matter, the images (the representation), the artist/author, the narrative/text, and the narrator/voice. In documentary film the lack of natural correspondence between these entities is often dissolved or denied – this work instead exposes the instances as separate units. A question arises: What alternative roles can be established between these elements, for example by negotiation and transference between them?

The methodological part of the text focuses on the conceptual invention made during the process, which I have called work story [verkberättelse]. A work story is a written or oral narrative about the forming of materials, immaterial units, situations, relations, and social practices that constitutes, or leads to, an artwork. By discussing analogies between storytelling, collecting, and biographical accounts together with examples from conceptual art, the dissertation shows how the work story is not only crucial for the understanding of the artwork but that the act of making and the very order or sequence in which the making proceeds often have symbolic, metaphorical, metonymical, political, and even epistemological meanings.

In an extended form a work story disseminates meaning rather than capturing it. This is the essayistic work story that permits a writer/artist to wander off and touch upon a subject as if in passing, reproducing its neglected genealogy and destiny in the detailed materiality of the work story.

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Sven Kristersson, Musical Performance

Title
The Singer in the Empty Space – a Poetics. Performing the Gilgamesh Epic and Songs of John Dowland and Evert Taube

Time and Place
29 May 2010, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Karin Helander, Stockholm University

Examination Board

  • Professor Bo Göranzon, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm
  • Artist Marie Bergman, Stockholm
  • Professor Anders Wiklund, Göteborgs universitet 

Keywords
Orpheus, empty space, performance, song, verse, Evert Taube, Gilgamesh, John Dowland

Abstract
Title: Sångaren på den tomma spelplatsen – en poetik. Att gestalta Gilgamesheposet och sånger av John Dowland och Evert Taube.
English title: The Singer in the Empty Space – a Poetics. Performing the Gilgamesh Epic and Songs of John Dowland and Evert Taube
Language: Swedish, with an English summary.
ISBN: 978-91-977758-9-2

The aim of this doctoral project is to explore an expanded role of the singer in an artistic field situated between poetry, theatre, music and reflection. The project consists of three parts:
Firstly, three performances of songs and poetry: (a) Me, Me and None but Me!, a blank-verse monologue connecting songs of John Dowland, (b) Gilgamesh – The Man Who Refused to Die, a musical version of the Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic, and (c) The Poet and Time, interpretations of works by the Swedish chansonier Evert Taube. As artistic methods, I use the Shakespearean traditions described in Peter Brook’s The Empty Space. Within these traditions, scenic communication is established using verbal imagery instead of a stage set.

Secondly, a thesis, where I describe the working process of the performances as a series of problem-solving. I also compare my performances to performances by contemporary artists. In the thesis, I also apply a method of inquiry in which I use the Orpheus myth as a means of understanding the expanded role of the singer.
Thirdly, a film by Lars Westman. The DVD contains excerpts from the performances and interviews with me, conducted by Westman and by the Norwegian singer and researcher Astrid Kvalbein.

The results of my research are firstly manifest in the performances themselves. Secondly, the written descriptions articulate a synthesis of artistic knowledge which has not previously been collected in one publication. Thirdly, the comparing of the Dowland performance with other performances constitutes a mapping of new forms of presenting lieder on a national level. The comparison with a Palestinian Gilgamesh performance gives new knowledge about how Western theatrical traditions are combined with Arabian storytelling tradition in an international context. Fourthly, the Taube performance implies new results in literary scholarship. Finally, the inquiries into the use of the Orpheus myth show that the mythic figure can be seen as an embodiment of “knowing-in-action”. Thus, the thesis establishes a link between practice-based research and mythology as embodied knowledge.

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Olle Zandén, Music Education

Title
Discourses on music-making: Conceptions of quality in music teachers’ dialogues on upper secondary school ensemble playing

Time and Place
16 April 2010, Academy of Music and Drama, (Högskolan för scen och musik), Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Petter Dyndahl, University College of Hedmark, Norway

Examination Board

  • Professor Görand Folkestad, School of Music, Lund University
  • Professor Christer Bouij, Örebro University
  • Professor Lars Lilliestam, Department of Cultural Sciences, University of Gothenburg

Abstract
Title: Samtal om samspel: Kvalitetsuppfattningar i musiklärares dialoger om ensemblespel på gymnasiet
English title: Discourses on music-making: Conceptions of quality in music teachers’ dialogues on upper secondary school ensemble playing
Language: Swedish
Keywords: assessment, criteria, music education, didactics, pedagogy, dialogical theory, upper secondary school, class room ensemble, rock and pop ensemble, teacher professionalisation.
ISBN: 978-91-977758-7-8

The purpose of this thesis is to analyse music teachers’ collegiate discourses on ensemble playing with regard to dialogically expressed criteria and conceptions of quality, and to relate these criteria and conceptions to the national governing documents for upper secondary ensemble education. The study has two theoretical perspectives, that is, a didactical perspective and a dialogical perspective.

The research setting as well as the research questions are clearly didactical, whilst dialogical theory is used both as a foundation for the research method and as an ontology against which the findings are interpreted. Topic analysis, which is based on a dialogical theory of sense-making according to which meaning is constituted in a double dialogical process between interactants, situation and socio-cultural traditions is the method used. Four groups of music teachers have discussed video excerpts of popular music ensembles from ensemble classes, and these discussions have been analysed with respect to topics displaying conceptions of musical and didactical quality. Topics are created through communicative projects, in which two or more people display a mutual understanding of what they are talking about. Thus, all conceptions of quality elicited from the participant groups of ensemble teachers are the result of intersubjective sense-making.

The results show that the ideal of informal music-making is so strong that the groups describe teacher intervention as detrimental to musical progress. Very little is said about the sounding music, whereas physical expressivity, autonomy and joy of playing are prominent topics. The apparent lack of music-specific, “contextual” criteria and the low valuation of the teachers’ work are discussed as possible threats to the existence of music as a subject in the national curriculum.

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Henric Benesch, Design

Title
Kroppar under träd - en miljö för konstnärlig forskning

Time and Place
26 February 2010 at Glashuset, Konsthögskolan Valand, Vasagatan 50, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Dr Catharina Gabrielsson, London School of Economics and Political Science

Examination Board

  • Professor Gunilla Bandolin, Konstfack, Stockholm
  • Professor Fredrik Nilsson, Instutitionen för arkitektur, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola
  • Professor Hans Hedberg, Högskolan för fotografi, Göteborgs universitet 

Note: An exhibition by Henric Benesch wil be held at Glashuset in connection with the public defence.

Abstract
This dissertation in the field of artistic research is an articulation, in
words and images, on the experience of working with a notional environment for artistic research. It is not a reflection on or a description of the process which the work has involved, but above all an articulation, characterisation and development, in words and images, of the conceptual and pictorial world constituted during, through and in the course of the actual work on an environment for artistic research in Vasaparken, Göteborg. The work is the design of a design process or, in the words of Aristotle, a form of poetic, in which great importance has been attached to making the special relationship between the concrete project and the text as clear as possible. Underlying this concrete work is an interest in the fundamental issue of the dynamic relation between activities (people), environments (buildings) and outward circumstances in perspectives of change. These issues are of a general nature but are especially relevant in relation to the emergence of new fields and practices, as in the case of artistic research. That is to say, fields, activities and practices which are more open by nature and more amenable to change than is usually the case with established fields, activities and practices. This work can also be viewed as a form of travel report, both general and specific, in the hope that it can be used as a form of guide book, to be read by those similarly interested and wishing to undertake corresponding journeys, but it can also serve as travel literature for those interested in the places or in travel as such.

ISBN: 978-91-977758-6-1

Download dissertation here.
 


Kajsa G Eriksson, Design

Title
Concrete Fashion: Dress, Art, and Engagement in Public Space

Time and Place

22 January 2010, Lilla salen, Frölunda Kulturhus, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Fil dr Ylva Gislén, Dramatiska institutet, Stockholm

Abstract
This dissertation is an example of artistic research that explores the border between fashion design and contemporary art, in order to place situated bodily practices within the larger field of exploration and ideology, and to discover new formats. The activities engaged in explore the dressed body as a contemporary art medium, and the performances are carried out in public space and within everyday life. The research utilizes ‘the itinerary’, put forward by Certeau, as a metaphor for its prevailing methods.

Three extensive art projects are presented within the dissertation: THREE, the Mirror Brooch, and Transformers. The first project concerns exhibition of the intermediate art form of the dressed body in the institutions of art, in this example, the gallery space; the second involves the presentation and use of the Mirror Brooch and examines art as an everyday life experience; and the third entails performances, staged in various locations and featuring the Transformer Jackets, and which are viewed as explorations into public space.

The relationship between experience, on one hand, and representation and documentation, on the other, is treated as a translation; a translation meant to be ‘haunting’, and one which feeds energy back into the ongoing artistic process. The conclusion is that, both, performances and translations can be used to strengthen identity and engagement in public space.

ISBN: 978-91-977758-4-7

Download dissertation here.
 


2009

David Crawford, Digital Representation

Title
Art and the Real-time Archive: Relocation, Remix, Response

Time and Place
8 October 2009, Robert Frank-salen, Högskolan för fotografi, Storgatan 43, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
PhD, artist, Kristoffer Arvidsson, Gothenburg

Committeé

  • Jonas Ingvarsson, lektor at Karlstad University
  • Anna Orrghen, lektor at Södertörns högskola, konstkritiker
  • Peter Hagdahl, professor in fine art vat Kungl. Konsthögskolan, Stockholm, artist

Abstract
If Internet artists have recently relocated their work to galleries and museums, there has meanwhile been an increasing engagement on the part of gallery artists with the media. While these migrations are often discussed in aesthetic if not economic terms, this essay asks what such phenomena can tell us about the changing nature of subjectivity in relation to media and technology.

Three main themes are introduced: the aura of information, inscription technologies, and the real-time archive. The themes extend across subsequent chapters addressing: the relocation of net art, the remix as an art method, and the capacity of the subject to respond to technology. !e idea that technologies alter subjects (produce subject-effects) plays a central role in the arguments
advanced.

Examples are drawn from both the author’s own art practice as well the practice of others, including Phil Collins and Steve McQueen. Theorists including Lewis Mumford and Bernard Stiegler are used to interpret the questions raised by this practice. It is concluded that relocation and remixing can respectively aid in the apprehension of subject-effects and support subjective autonomy.

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Ragnhild Sandberg Jurström, Music Education

Title
Shaping musical performances. A social semiotic study of choir conductors' multimodal communication in choir

Time and Place
18 September 2009, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Professor Staffan Selander from Institutionen för didaktik och pedagogiskt arbete at Stockholm University

Committée

  • Docent Claes Ericsson, Högskolan in Halmstad
  • Professor Eva Nässén, Academy of Music and Drama, Göteborg University
  • Professor Mikael Alexandersson, IPD, Göteborg University

Keywords
Choir singing, choir conductor, choir singer, musical interpretation and performance, learning, communication, interaction, video analysis, multimodality, social semiotics, metafunctions, design

Abstract
Title: Att ge form åt musikaliska gestaltningar. En socialsemiotisk studie av körledares multimodala kommunikation i kör.
English title: Shaping musical performances. A social semiotic study of choir conductors' multimodal communication in choir
Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-977757-9-3

The purpose of this thesis is to identify and describe how musical interpretations and performances are semiotically designed and realised by choir conductors in their interaction with choir singers during rehearsals and concerts, and also to find methods for
how these actions can be analysed and described.
The data consists of video-recorded rehearsals and concerts with six Swedish professional choir conductors and their choirs. The video films are transcribed in detail, with focus on how semiotic modes, such as gestures, gazes, body movements, singing, printed score and piano-playing, are used when choir conductors in their interaction with choir singers work with a musical composition.

The study uses a multimodal and social semiotic theory, which implies that communication and learning is seen as a social process of transformative sign-making. The concept design is central since it is a way for sign-makers to create different communicative conditions for meaning-making, based on their interests and choices of modes.
The analyses focus on how choir conductors in their use of different modes perform and illustrate the music, how they interact with the choir singers, and how their actions are realised in different designs. The analyses also focus on what cultural conventions surround the actions that occur.

The thesis brings light to the complexity and multiplicity of an audiovisual culture, where choir conductors in their use of different repertoires of action and designs constantly vary how they perform and illustrate the music. The results show how these actions afford various choices and conditions for the choir singers to learn and perform the music, how a collective and local musical language is constructed and how the dominant positionings of the conductors can be seen as productive leadership.

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Anders Tykesson, Musical Performance and Interpretation

Title
Music as Action. Analysis, Musical Interpretation and Performance of a Work. With a Study of Anders Eliasson’s Quartetto d‘Archi

Time and place
4 June, 2010 (seminar-concert) and 1 p.m. (public defence), “Ensemblesalen”, Academy of Music and Drama, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Søren Kjørup, Professor of Practical Philosophy, Roskilde University, Denmark, and Jan Ling, Professor Emeritus of Musicology, University of Gothenburg

Examination Board

  • Lasse Thoresen, kompositör, professor i komposition, Norges musikhögskola, Oslo
  • Lena Weman Ericsson, musiker, fil dr i musikalisk gestaltning, lektor vid Institutionen för musisk och medier, Luleå tekniska universitet
  • Gunnar D Hansson, författare, poet, essäist, översättare och docent i litteraturvetenskap samt professor i litterär gestaltning, Göteborgs universitet 

Keywords
musical analysis, musical gestures, musical interpretation and performance, musical meaning, musical narrative, music theory, music and emotion, music as emotional expression, music as action, music as motion, music as mimesis, music and language, musical hermeneutics, musical phenomenology, musical semiotics, artistic research, Anders Eliasson, Hans-Heinrich Eggebrecht, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Robert Hatten, Ernst Kurth, Paul Ricoeur, Bo Wallner.

Abstract
English title: Music as Action. Analysis, Musical Interpretation and Performance of a Work. With a Study of Anders Eliasson’s Quartetto d‘Archi
Swedish title: Musik som handling. Verkanalys, interpretation och musikalisk gestaltning. Med ett studium av Anders Eliassons Quartetto d’Archi
Language: Swedish

ISBN: 978-91-977757-7-9

The aim of the dissertation is to illustrate the potential musical analysis has in the development of artistic questions with regard to the interpretation and performance of western art music.
The analyses of the dissertation focus on Quartetto d’Archi, by the Swedish composer Anders Eliasson, and discussions of music as action, music as emotional expression, music as motion and music as mimesis are based on the four movements of this string quartet. The methods which are used are the very ones the project examines, namely the analysis of and the reflection on the musical work.

The author has attempted to gain a deeper knowledge of the work and its possible interpretations by means of a comparative study of other music and literature within the theory of music and within philosophical thinking. The hermeneutics of Hans–Georg Gadamer and Paul Ricoeur are significant to the thesis. For example, the author claims that Ricoeur’s concept of interpretation, in which understanding interacts with explanation, and where the interpreter “appropriates” the text, could be applied to musical interpretation. References in music, or in artworks in general, to phenomena, actions and concepts may be explained through the concept of mimesis. Within the doctoral project, the author has worked with chamber ensembles in the form of seminars at the Academy of Music and Drama, the University of Gothenburg.

One of the central claims of the thesis is that the musical work opens up to the possibilities of interpretation through its own way of being, in the way it expresses itself in its structures. Questions of the significance of music must be posed to the musical work itself, which answers through different categories of interpretation; it is by means of these categories of interpretation that the meaning and significance of a musical work can be interpreted. Four categories are presented: processual interpretation, narrative interpretation, characterial interpretation and emotional interpretation.

Download dissertation here.
 


Harald Stenström, Musical Performance and Interpretation

Title
Free Ensemble Improvisation

Time and Place
9 June, Högskolan för scen och musik, Artisten, Fågelsången 1, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Jari Perkiömäki, Ph.D. in Music, Senior Lecturer at the Sibelius Academy, Finland

Examination Board

  • Cort Lippe, kompositör, biträdande professor i komposition, Buffalo University, USA
  • Mary Oliver, fil dr, improvisationsmusiker, USA/Amsterdam
  • Anders Wiklund, docent, professor, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet

Keywords
aleatorics, artistic research, attractor state, central tone, chaotic systems, collective understanding, comprovisation, conceptual model, directed motion, ensemble size, feedback and feedforward, free ensemble improvisation, gesture, importance of rhythm, indeterminacy, interactional skill, listening skill, musical evaluation, musical interaction,
musical maturity, musical chemistry, musical interpretation, musical composition, nonidiomatic improvisation, rhythmic flow, sound properties, stylistic influences

ISBN: 978-91-977757-8-6

Abstract
The aim of this doctoral project has been to study so-called non-idiomatic improvisation in ensembles consisting of two or three musicians who play together without any restrictions regarding style or genre and without having predetermined what is to be played or how they should play.
The background to this thesis has been the author’s own free improvising, which he has pursued since 1974, and the questions that have arisen whilst music-making. The thesis takes three of these questions as its point of departure:
– what is free ensemble improvisation, what characterizes free ensemble improvisation and how can it be defined
– how does free ensemble improvisation relate to:
– – instrumental technique
– – idiomatic improvisation and stylistic influences
– – composition
– – interpretation
– – aleatorics and indeterminacy
– – different types of sytems (e.g. biological, social, dynamic/chaotic systems)
– what might a conceptual model as a theoretical base for free ensemble improvisation look like?

The artistic/performative part of this research project has primarily consisted of public concerts, as a result of longer/shorter periods of cooperation with four permanent and a number of temporary (ad hoc) ensembles. The results provide a better understanding of what free ensemble improvisation is, in what respects it differs from other forms of music-making and how it can be defined. Free ensemble improvisation’s relations to the points mentioned above were found to be more multifaceted than expected. However, it was possible to attain a basic two-layered conceptual model as a theoretical base for free ensemble improvisation and, in its extension, as a basis for the analysis of free ensemble improvisation. The study includes numerous concert projects, of which several are recorded and included in this book on two CDs with MP3 files.

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Bryndis Snæbjörnsdóttir, Fine Art

Title
Spaces of Encounter: Art and Revision in Human-Animal Relations

Time and Place
27 March 2009, Glashuset, Konsthögskolan Valand, Vasagatan 50, Göteborg.

Faculty examiner
Sarat Maharaj, Professor vid Konsthögskolan i Malmö, Lunds universitet, och professor i konsthistoria vid Goldsmith University College

Examination Board

  • Fil dr Karin Wagner, IT-universitetet, Göteborg
  • Artist and PhD professor Martha Fleming, Creative Director, Biomedicine on Display Project, Medicinsk Museion, Institute of Public Health, Medical Faculty at the University of Copenhagen, även/also Visiting Senior Research Fellow, Materials Research Group, School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, King's College London
  • Lektor Henk Slager, Dean, Utrecht Graduate School of Visual Art and Design, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Keywords
animal studies, artistic research, conceptual art, contemporary art, contextual art, fine art research, installation art, photography, post-humanism, relational art, Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson, site-specific art, taxidermy
ISBN: 978-91-977757-6-2

Abstract
This PhD project explores contemporary Western human relationships with animals through a ‘relational’ art practice. It centres on three art projects produced by Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson – nanoq: flat out and bluesome; (a)fly; and seal – all utilize lens-based media and installations.

Discourses on how humans construct their relationship with animals are central to all three projects. The first one looks at polar bears, the second at pets, and the third at seals, in a variety of different sites within clearly defined contexts and geographical locations. The thesis explores the visual art methodologies employed in the projects, tracing in turn their relationship to writings about human-animal relations. This includes both writings researched in the making of the works and those considered retrospectively in the reflections on each art project.

These artworks engage their audiences in a series of ‘encounters’ with the subject through simultaneous meetings of duality, e.g. haunting vs. hunting, perfection vs. imperfection and the real vs. the unreal.

These dualities are important in theorizing this relational space in which the eclipse of the ‘real’ animal in representation occurs and in formulating questions embedded in and arising from the artworks on the construction and the limits of these boundaries. The ‘three registers of representation’, as put forward by the artists Joseph Kosuth and Mary Kelly, have further helped to frame and develop the thinking, concerning both the mechanisms within the works and their perceived effects.

Download dissertation here.
 


Magali Ljungar Chapelon, Digital representation

Title
Actor-Spectator in a Virtual Reality Arts Play. Towards new artistic
experiences in between illusion and reality in immersive virtual environments

Time and Place
27 January 2009, Robert Franksalen, School of Photography, Storgatan 43, Gothenburg

Faculty examiner
Fil dr Pelle Ehn, professor i IT, design och nya medier på K3 ( Konst, Kultur och Kommunikation), Malmö University

Examining committee

  • Willmar Sauter, professor i teatervetenskap, Stockholms universitet
  • Eva Nässén, professor, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet
  • Jan Bärmark, professor vid institutionen för idéhistoria och vetenskapsteori, humanistiska fakulteten, Göteborgs universitet 

Keywords
Artistic crossover, actor-spectator, Virtual Reality Art, VR-Cube, immersion, interactivity, experience of art, audience experience, play, metaphor, illusion, reality, Gestalt, metaphorical journey, social interaction, performing arts, visual arts, computer games, adventure games, entertainment
ISBN: 978-91-977757-1-7

Abstract
This doctoral project brings to the fore the specificity of the artistic experience when the Virtual Reality Cube, a medium based on immersive virtual reality technology, is used as artistic virtual space, where the stage and the auditorium blend into one and spectators and actors no longer have distinctive roles. It consists of three integrated parts: a written thesis, a VR artwork and a DVD, which illustrates the text, the production process of the VR work, and which also presents an interpretation of the research results in filmic and photographic form.

Gadamer’s concepts of play and experience of art, Aristotle’s conception of drama and Ricoeur’s theory of metaphor are used as points of departure in order to coin the term virtual reality arts play or VR arts play that characterises this kind of immersive journey in between illusion and reality. Empirical and theoretical functions interweave in a chorus of voices representing the experience of all actors involved: the audience, the production team and experts from several art fields, computer-games and media. Audience surveys show that all the respondents but one, children as well as adults, thought that this type of VR artwork opens up new ways for an artist to give shape to an artistic vision and for an audience to communicate with and experience an artwork from within. What appears as the most worthwhile and unique aspect of the experience is the opportunity to experience fictive, imaginary worlds and characters that cannot be represented by other means than through an immersive virtual reality medium, i.e. within a physical space where the audience becomes physically immersed and participant “on stage”.

The essence of such an experience is to be found in the notion of “play in between”, at the crossover of several art forms and computer games, for audiences which consider themselves as both actor/participants and spectators. Research results, exposed and illuminated through semiotics and hermeneutics, show that such experiences may develop in the form of intimate experiences for a little group of spectators or within new social contexts for broader audiences and with several possible applications within the fields of art and entertainment.

Download dissertation here.


2008

Mike Bode och Staffan Schmidt, Fine art

Title
Off the Grid

Time and venue
Tuesday 28/10 2008, 15:00, Wallenstamsalen, Göteborgs stadsmuseum

Opponent
Professor Mark Nash, Royal College of Art, London

Examination Board

  • Professor Bengt Kristensson Uggla, Åbo Akademi
  • Fil dr Edda Manga, Institutionen för idé- och lärdomshistoria, Uppsala universitet
  • Professor Esther Shalev-Gerz, Konsthögskolan Valand
  • Fil dr Maria Hellström Reimer, SLU och Malmö högskola (K3)
  • Fil dr Guy Baeten, institutionen för kulturgeografi och ekonomisk geografi, Lunds universitet

Keywords
artistic research, visual concepts, situated image, dialogue, ecological and political engagement, off grid living, housing estate suburbia, travel, self-defi nition, community, institution,
isomorphic, lived third space.

Abstract
Title: Off the grid
Language: English

ISBN 978-91-977757-0-0

Off the grid is an artistic research thesis which puts a Swedish housing estate in a video interview dialogue with homeowners in the Northeastern US through focusing on three topics: travel, self-defi nition, and community. Based on the situated, visual and conceptual image the project merges seemingly incompatible experiences: eight residents in Husby, an immigrant community outside Stockholm, and eight households not connected to the utility grid, in upstate areas of New England and New York State – and two artistic researchers at University of Gothenburg. The interviewees are paired together and handed unedited copies of each other’s refl ections. We asked them for their comments, elucidating the practical and metaphorical consequences of travel, self-defi nition, and community.

Even though backgrounds, stories and current conditions differ, an understanding of common interests and similarities are clearly identifi ed. Among the three questions discussed the right to self-defi nition stands out as central: it is opposed, delayed in its implementation, violated or threatened – still, all participants individually and/or collectively struggle to uphold it. In thinking with the visual and conceptual image Off the grid also offers new perspectives on the significance of artistic research, contributing to its further contextualization.

Download dissertation here.

 


Otto von Busch, Design 

Title
FASHION-able: Hacktivism and Engaged Fashion Design

Time and venue
Friday, October 24, 2008, 10:00 i Stora hörsalen, HDK - Högskolan för Design och Konsthantverk

Opponent

Professor John Wood, Goldsmiths, University of London

Examination Board

  • Docent Lisbeth Svengren, institutionen för designvetenskaper, Lunds universitet
  • Fil dr Ylva Gisslén, Dramatiska institutet, Stockholm
  • Professor Ole Lützow Holm, Högskolan för scen och musik, Göteborgs universitetOrdförande för disputationen

Keywords
Fashion Design, Hacktivism, Hacking, Heresy, Small Change, Professional-Amateurs, Do-it-yourself, Action Spaces, Artistic Research, Practice-based research

Abstract
Title: FASHION-able: Hacktivism and Engaged Fashion Design
Language: English
ISBN: 978-91-977757-2-4

This thesis consists of a series of extensive projects which aim to explore a new designer role for fashion. It is a role that experiments with how fashion can be reverse engineered, hacked, tuned and shared among many participants as a form of social activism. This social design practice can be called the hacktivism of fashion. It is an engaged and collective process of enablement, creative resistance and DIY practice, where a community share methods and experiences on how to expand action spaces and develop new forms of craftsmanship. In this practice, the designer engages participants to reform fashion from a phenomenon of dictations and anxiety to a collective experience of empowerment, in other words, to make them become fashion-able.

As its point of departure, the research takes the practice of hands-on exploration in the DIY upcycling of clothes through “open source” fashion “cookbooks”. By means of hands-on processes, the projects endeavour to create a complementary understanding of the modes of production within the field of fashion design. The artistic research projects have ranged from DIY-kits released at an international fashion week, fashion experiments in galleries, collaborative “hacking” at a shoe factory, engaged design at a rehabilitation centre as well as combined efforts with established fashion brands.

Using parallels from hacking, heresy, fan fiction, small change and professional-amateurs, the thesis builds a non-linear framework by which the reader can draw diagonal interpretations through the artistic research projects presented. By means of this alternative reading new understandings may emerge that can expand the action spaces available for fashion design. This approach is not about subverting fashion as much as hacking and tuning it, and making its sub-routines run in new ways, or in other words, bending the current while still keeping the power on.

Download dissertation here.


Svein Erik Tandberg, Musical performance and interpretation

Title
Imagination, Form, Movement and Sound: Studies in Musical Improvisation

Time and venue
Thursday, 28 August, 2008
Lunchkoncert between 12.00-12.30
Artisten, Orgelsalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

OBS! Svein Erik Tandberg håller dagen innan ett seminarium: Källor ur improvisationshistorien (onsdag 27/8 kl 13-15). Artisten, Orgelsalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Fil. dr., professor Gustav Adolf Krieg
Professor Gustav Adolf Krieg är en av de ledande auktoriteterna inom forskningen kring orgelimprovisation och orgelmusikens roll i en teologisk kontext. Krieg är både kyrkomusiker, teolog och musikforskare och representerar en mångsidig kompetens inom orgelmusikens område och hans publikationslista omfattar verk inom såväl orgelmusikens och liturgins område som inom det teologiska fältet. Krieg undervisar f.n. i liturgiskt orgelspel, hymnologi, liturgik och musikhistoria vid Musikhögskolorna i Düsseldorf och Köln samt tjänstgör som professor i praktisk teologi vid Bonns universitet.

Examination Board

  • Mats Malm, professor, fil dr, litteraturvetenskapliga institutionen, Göteborgs universitet
  • Kati Hämäläinen, professor och dr i musik vid Sibeliusakademien, Helsingfors
  • Stefan Therstam, professor, organist och prefekt för institutionen för klassisk musik vid Kungliga Musikhögskolan i Stockholm

Keywords
Aesthetic, chronology versus phenomenology, organ, processes, style

Abstract
Title: Imagination, Form, Movement and Sound: Studies in Musical Improvisation
Language: English
ISBN: 978-91-975911-8-8

How does one improvise? How can one learn the art of improvisation? By considering these two questions this thesis aspires to make a contribution towards a greater understanding of what the production of improvised music actually involves.

The organ has long traditions as an instrument on which music is improvised, and this study aims to focus primarily on organ improvisation. It is assumed that spontaneous impulses, rational thought and an extensive array of physical movements have their origins in the emotional, intellectual and physical aspects of a person. These different facets of a person, which continually interact with and influence each other, form a complex series of behaviour patterns. It can be useful to experience the interactive energy between these facets in order to approach an understanding of improvisation. This hypothesis is based on an assumption that improvised music is created by an interaction between large numbers of internalised concepts of musical sound, along with a corresponding array of precise physical movements. The sounds are expressed through the actions of the improviser. Ideally these actions will have their origins in more or less welldefined aesthetic concepts. Thus the hypothesis of this research is that it is in the light of the improviser’s different perceptions of the words “imagination” and “form” that the musical train of events is set in motion. This study should be regarded as artistic research. The term “artistic” defines a research position that is related to an actual artistic practice. The work incorporates elements which can be described as creative research. This means that researches do not only form a subject for discussion, but have actually resulted in the creation of three different recording projects presented on four CDs. These musical manifestations are intended to serve both as demonstrations of working methods whilst also functioning as reference points. Since art both consists of deeds and thoughts the aim here is to probe the links between practical and theoretical aspects of improvisation. The recordings should thus be regarded as a medium to emphasise and give added weight to the arguments.

The study is divided into two main sections. The first part focuses on the art of organ improvisation as practised during different periods of history, whilst the second part considers the aesthetical and practical aspects involved. The question as to how differing forms of an improvisatory “vocabulary” can be acquired, assimilated and developed will occupy a prominent position in this latter section.

Download dissertation here.
 


Maria Bania, Musical performance and interpretation

Title
"Sweetenings" and "Babylonish Gabble": Flute Vibrato and Articulation of Fast Passages in the 18th and 19th centuries

Abstract
During the 18th and 19th centuries, vibrato as well as the articulation of fast passages was often not indicated in the musical scores, but was left to the players' discretion within prevailing practice. In this doctoral thesis in musical interpretation and performance the playing techniques used for vibrato and fast passages have been tested and evaluated in musical practice, and sounding examples from concerts and recordings are included as an integrated part of the presentation.

Time and venue
Tuesday, 10 June, 2008, 15.00
Artisten, Ensemblesalen, Högskolan för scen och musik, Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Fil. dr. Samantha Owens, Lecturer in musicology. She holds a BMus and PhD from Victoria University, Wellington, NZ. Lectures in music history and historical performance practice. Her research interests are focussed on music of the late 17th and 18th centuries. Also a baroque oboist.

Examination Board

  • Anders Jonhäll
  • Ruth Steinsland
  • Alf Björnberg 

Keywords
Historical Performance Practice, Flute, Vibrato, Articulation, Double-tonguing, Artistic Research, Flattement, Johann Joachim Quantz, Johann George Tromlitz, Morten Raehs, Johan Helmich Roman, Charles Nicholson, Louis Drouët

Abstract
Title: “Sweetenings” and “Babylonish Gabble”: Flute Vibrato and the Articulation of Fast Passages in the 18th and 19th centuries
Language: English

ISBN: 978-91-975-911-7-1

During the 18th and 19th centuries, vibrato as well as the articulation of fast passages was often not indicated in the musical scores, but was left to the players’ discretion within prevailing practice. A finger-vibrato technique that this study names the flattement technique was the most recommended vibrato technique in Western classical music throughout the 18th century. Another finger-vibrato technique used was called martellement or Schwebungen. During the first half of the 19th century the flattement technique coexisted on equal terms with chest vibrato, which was during most of the period under investigation slow and controlled, typically four waves on a long note.The syllables and spellings documented for double-tonguing on the flute can be categorized in three techniques, d-g/t-k, d-r/t-d and d-l/t-tl, where d-g, d-r and d-l represent softer nuances. During the 18th and first half of the 19th century, d-l/t-tl was the most common double-tonguing technique in England and Germany, whereas in France it was not much used. Legato could be applied when not indicated; during the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th the articulation patterns paired slurs and two slurred, two tipped were commonly recommended. In France, d-g/t-k was the dominating double-tonguing from the late 18th century and on, and the embracing of this technique also in Germany and England in the second half of the 19th century reflects a transition from the 18th century ideal of a rounder execution of an articulated fast passage towards a shorter staccato ideal.The playing techniques recommended in the sources have been tested and evaluated in musical practice by the author. For a more complete understanding of the problem areas, sounding examples from concerts and recordings are integrated in the dissertation.

Download dissertation here.
 


2007

Vidar Vikøen, Musical performance and interpretation

Title
Studier omkring artikulasjon i tysk romantisk orgelmusikk, 1800-1850. Med et tillegg om registreringspraksis.

Time and venue
Tuesday, October 2, 2007, kl. 12.15
Artisten, sal A505, Högskolan för scen och musik,
Fågelsången 1, Göteborg

Opponent
Kati Hämäläinen, professor och dr i musik vid Sibeliusakademien, Helsingfors.

Examination Board

  • Stefan Therstam, professor, organist och prefekt för institutionen för klassisk musik vid Kungliga Musikhögskolan i Stockholm
  • Anders Wiklund, fil dr och professor vid Högskolan för scen och musik vid Göteborgs universitet
  • Ola Stockfelt, docent i musikvetenskap vid institutionen för kultur, estetik och medier, Göteborgs universitet

Keywords
Organ, performance practise, articulation, legato, non legato, slurring, fingering, registration

Abstract
Title: Studier omkring artikulasjon i tysk romantisk orgelmusikk, 1800–1850. Med et tillegg om registreringspraksis.
English title: Studies on Articulation in German Romantic Organ Music, 1800–1850. With a supplement on Regi
Language: Norwegian
ISBN: 978-91-975911-6-4

The starting point of this study concerns the problems connected to articulation and phrasing in early nineteenth-century organ music. It is generally accepted that legato was the basic articulation of the romantic period, and the aim is on one hand to describe the legato of the early nineteenth century as opposed to the legato we know from the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and on the other hand, to determine what features in the music could guide different types of articulation in a score with no articulation signs. Another problem concerns slurring and the study will try to generate some alternative solutions to the existing ones.

Early nineteenth-century Germany saw the emergence of a vast number of organ schools and it is a representative selection of these organ schools that constitute the basic source material for the study. The information that was gained from these sources was also applied to relevant music from the period, and in this way brought forward as important vehicles in an artistic performance presented on a CD-recording.

The organ music in this period was divided between two major styles: the bound style (gebunden) and the free style (freie). The bound style was literally bound to strong rules concerning harmony and counterpoint, and the articulation was generally legato. But the non legato articulation of the eighteenth century could still be used as articulation for music written in the free style and “with a lively character and a fast motion.”

The study showed that the fingering that was used for playing music in the bound style was identical with the polyphonic fingering we know from the early eighteenth century, e.g. using finger continuation instead of finger substitution. Consequently, legato in connection with finger continuation has to be created with a subtle form of release, implying that the finger stays in contact with the key until the key has ended its upward motion, before it moves to the next key. This creates a less uniform legato, and adds structure and nuance to playing, which could otherwise not be obtained using a traditional modern legato technique.

Download dissertation here.
 


Kaja Tooming, Design

Title
Toward Poetics of Fibre Art and Design. Aesthetic and Acoustic Qualities of Hand-tufted Materials in Interior Spatial Design

Time and venue
2007-06-08, 13.30, Jonsereds herrgård

Opponent
Professor Chris Rust, Head of the Arts & Design Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University

Examining Committee

  • Dr Catherine Harper, Head of School of Architecture and Design, University of Brighton
  • Tekn dr Mendel Kleiner, Chalmers Teknisk akustik 
  • Tekn dr Fredrik Nilsson, Chalmers Arkitektur

Keywords
Fibre art, acoustics, interior design, hand tufting, sculpture, practice-based research, productive science, poetics, emotional expression, unity

Abstract
This inquiry explores the aesthetic and acoustic qualities of fibre art and design. The goal is to understand how the manner of hand tufting, the selection of fibre materials, and the creation of two- and three-dimensional forms can work together to solve problems of interior design. The strategy of the inquiry is “productive science” or “poetics.” The strength of this approach is the combination of analysis and synthesis. It begins with analysis of the functional elements of fibre art. This includes a description and explanation of the technique of hand tufting as well as scientific and technical studies of the aesthetic and acoustic properties of a variety of fibre materials. It then proceeds to consider the problem of creative artistic synthesis by focusing on the integration of all of the functional elements that are involved in creating works of fibre art and design. The centrepiece of this research is the creation of an ensemble of three fibre art works for the Jonsereds herrgård, a manor house of historical importance in Göteborg, Sweden. One work is a large fibre art hanging installed on the central wall of the grand dining room of the Manor. The other works are two fibre art sculptures, also sited in the dining room. These are innovative examples of fibre art as a functional design art. The inquiry concludes with a reflection on the nature of unity in art and design. One of the central claims of this research is that perception, meaning, and emotional expression work together in creating the unity or wholeness of the products of art and design. The discussion develops this idea through consideration of the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Roland Barthes, and John Dewey. This leads to a discussion of the intelligibility of emotional expression and the criterion of the compelling correctness of an artist’s decisions in creating a work of art or design.

ISBN: 978-91-975911-5-7
 


2006

Kim Jeoung-Ah, Design

Title 
Paper-Composite Porcelain. Characterisation of Material Properties and Workability from a Ceramic Art and Design Perspective
ISBN: 91-975911-2-2

Time
2006-08-25

Opponent
Ken Friedman, Institute for Communication, Culture and Language
at the Norwegian School of Management in Oslo, Norway

Abstract
Paper-composite porcelain is a type of paper clay which is made by combining any kind of porcelain with paper. Paper is added to clay to improve low green strength and plasticity - two of the main practical problems of working with porcelain. Despite widespread interest in the material, the characteristics of paper- composite porcelain have remained undetermined. The purpose of this research was to understand the artistic applicability of, and obtain reliable knowledge of the properties of paper-composite porcelain.

The results provide new knowledge of paper-composite porcelain by identifying the reinforcement role of paper fibre in the formation and fabrication stages. They also demonstrate a practically tested and documented method for slip casting which shows some of the potential application of paper-composite porcelain in artistic practice.

Download dissertation here.
 


Monica Lindgren, Musical Education

Title
Att skapa ordning för det estetiska i skolan. Diskursiva postitioneringar i samtal med lärare och skolledare

Time
2006-03-17

Abstract
Recent rhetoric on aesthetic activities of the school has gained an increasingly large scope over the last few decades in Swedish texts on educational politics and educat-ional science. In relation to the questioning of the Government-controlled school, the field of school and aesthetics is studied from an interest in how ideals of knowledge are created and preserved through specific control strategies.

The starting point of the study is that the field of aesthetics and school is created in discursive practices through linguistic interaction by way of specific power techniques. The aim is to identify and describe current discourses relating to the aesthetic activities in compulsory school, and to problematise these with regard to power and control.

Data-collection included individual and group interviews with 55 teachers and head teachers from seven compulsory schools during the years 2002–2004. The participants conducted the discussions concerning “the aesthetic activities of the school by themselves.

In the analysis, five discourses concerning the construction of legitimacy surrounding the aesthetic activities of the school were identified and subsequently five discourses concerning the construction of legitimacy surrounding the aesthetic competence of the teachers. The result shows that the discourses might be construed as being based on more comprehensive discourses significant to our time; education for freedom and exercising social control in the name of aesthetics.

The idea of the inherent power of aesthetic activities to alter a person’s character and capability of leading a "good life" may be said to fit in well with a time of striving for free and harmonious citizens in tune with an accepted social behaviour.

In conclusion, from this message the teachers are portrayed not as more or less competent professionals but as free and exemplary persons.

Download dissertation here.

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